KADE’S EXCEPTIONAL MAZDA RX7 BATHURST R

KADE’S EXCEPTIONAL FD3S7 MAZDA RX7 BATHURST R

Photos and words by: Jordan Leist

The good old COVID tax has fucked it for a lot of us. The prices for some of our most-admired cars have blown out. The stark reality is, the average punter has no chance of securing a classic JDM ride these days. I think we all have regrets about not dropping the hammer on ‘that’ car a few years ago.

If I told you what Kade Stefanatos paid for his 2002 Mazda RX7 Bathurst R three years ago, you would nearly fall over. If I told you what Kade Stefanatos has since spent to get his FD to this level, it would have the same effect. As we all know, we aren’t into modifying cars to make money; it is more about the smiles per mile. Funnily enough, though, I reckon Kade is still ahead when all the dollars and cents are added up in this current climate.

Sure, Kade copped a sweet deal, but what would you expect from an experienced car salesman. He knows a thing or two about piston-powered machines, but he is the first to admit that he had limited knowledge when it came to the force of the Dorito motor back then. “Before the RX7, I was heavily into Nissans. I had owned a couple of R34s and an S14. My brother shared the same passion, so I was happy to stay with the Nissan marque. That was until I spotted the RX7 on Facebook Marketplace. I was intrigued about the rotary side of things, and it was a massive change from the BMW 135i I was punting around at the time.

The car looked pretty good, and the owner told me he had recently installed a rebuilt motor that he was currently running in. After he took me for a lap around the block, with just seven pounds of boost dialled in, I was sold.” explained Kade. The performance of the 13B was enough for him to never look twice at another Nissan.

It was a baptism of fire into the rotary realm for Kade though, because it wouldn’t be a rotary if something didn’t fuck up. “The car started blowing huge amounts of white smoke, which turned out to be the ‘new’ ProBoost turbo the original owner had fitted. I thought that was the main issue, so I purchased a GTX3582R and had the experts at Rotomotion fit and wire up a new Haltech Elite 1500 ECU with all the bells and whistles. After the retune, the issues appeared to had vanished.”

With things looking up for young Kade, he decided to throw caution to the wind and chase some more power for the FD. “I made the switch to a BorgWarner EFR8374 turbo mounted to a Turblown manifold with twin 40mm external gates. At the same time, I upgraded to four 1650cc injectors, bought a Radium Engineering fuel hanger to fix the fuel starvation issue, and three Walbro 460 fuel pumps were added too.”

In a situation that none of us wants to see, the car was on the dyno when the engine lost all compression. It was toast. The rebuild the previous owner had done used the cars original dented rotors and chattered housings. It appeared that the only new parts employed were the apex seals. If you guessed that Kade was pissed, you guessed right.

“I had no choice but to do a complete engine rebuild. The guys at Rotomotion took control of the process, starting with a 12.7mm stud kit, sending off the rotating assembly to Sydney to get balanced, clearancing the rotors and installing the 2mm SCR Power Seals.” At the end of the day, the 13b extend port motor developed a solid 531.6hp at the wheels on Flex-fuel E85. More than enough for street duties.

With all of that new power onboard, Kade decided to throw a fistful of cash at the suspension. With stance a priority, he opted for Fortune Auto 500 Series Coilovers with Air Piston Lift System and a tonne of HardRace components make the twisty stuff even more exciting. Nestled in front of slotted rotors are Kade’s favourite all-time wheel – Work Meister S1 3Ps. These are his third set over the years. Upfront is 18x9s (+22), and the rear wears 18x10s (+18) with Nexen rubber. Project Kics R40 Iconix Neo Chrome Black Alloy Caps add a bit more wank factor for the fanboys.

With a race-inspired cabin from the factory, there weren’t too many upgrades needed in there. Kade settled for a Nardi deep corn 350mm suede steering wheel, FEED handbrake and gearshift boot, and FEED floor mats to match the black with red stitch, Bride Stradia Sport II seats. It wasn’t until the Fortune Auto air pistons that the interior took an about shift.

“Seeing as I needed to fit the dual Viair compressors and a large tank in the back, I decided to do a custom audio install at the same time. There was only one person I considered for the job – Fabian Augustine from Level Up Audio. He is an expert in the field.” The rear cargo area now contains two Audison 10-inch subs and an Alpine PDX V9 five-channel amplifier, as well as the suspension accessories. Ryan Lightbody, a mate of Fabian’s, did a stellar job on the hardlines. In the front doors, Fabian slotted in a pair of Morel Virtus Nano 602 splits. The slimmer woofer was required to fit the factory location. The sound, well, it is exceptional.

The body of the seven is a subtle blend of factory and aftermarket. Carbon fibre is abundant, appearing on the Carbonetics RE-Amemiya pro-style rear diffuser, the Angry Panda Odula-style wing blade, the JJ Carbon Re Amemiya front fender vents, AutoEXE side skirts and URAS GT front lip and, of course, as an insert in the Angry Panda RE-Amemiya style bonnet. Smoked lenses are a neat touch, as is the Car Shop GLOW rear taillight panel.

As much as he likes the look of the car at the moment, Kade still has some plans ahead. “I want to fit a FEED Widebody kit and then give the car a full respray. To accommodate the body changes, I will upgrade to 19-inch Meister S1 wheels and Willwood 6 piston brakes. Then I think I will have achieved my ultimate goal.”

KADE’S EXCEPTIONAL FD3S7 MAZDA RX7 BATHURST R

The good old COVID tax has fucked it for a lot of us. The prices for some of our most-admired cars have blown out. The stark reality is, the average punter has no chance of securing a classic JDM ride these days. I think we all have regrets about not dropping the hammer on ‘that’ car a few years ago.

If I told you what Kade Stefanatos paid for his 2002 Mazda RX7 Bathurst R three years ago, you would nearly fall over. If I told you what Kade Stefanatos has since spent to get his FD to this level, it would have the same effect. As we all know, we aren’t into modifying cars to make money; it is more about the smiles per mile. Funnily enough, though, I reckon Kade is still ahead when all the dollars and cents are added up in this current climate.

Sure, Kade copped a sweet deal, but what would you expect from an experienced car salesman. He knows a thing or two about piston-powered machines, but he is the first to admit that he had limited knowledge when it came to the force of the Dorito motor back then. “Before the RX7, I was heavily into Nissans. I had owned a couple of R34s and an S14. My brother shared the same passion, so I was happy to stay with the Nissan marque. That was until I spotted the RX7 on Facebook Marketplace. I was intrigued about the rotary side of things, and it was a massive change from the BMW 135i I was punting around at the time.

The car looked pretty good, and the owner told me he had recently installed a rebuilt motor that he was currently running in. After he took me for a lap around the block, with just seven pounds of boost dialled in, I was sold.” explained Kade. The performance of the turbocharged 13B was enough for him to never look twice at another Nissan.

It was a baptism of fire into the rotary realm for Kade though, because it wouldn’t be a Mazda or a rotary if something didn’t fuck up. “The car started blowing huge amounts of white smoke, which turned out to be the ‘new’ ProBoost turbo the original owner had fitted. I thought that was the main issue, so I purchased a Garrett GTX3582R and had the experts at Rotomotion fit and wire up a new Haltech Elite 1500 ECU with all the bells and whistles. After the retune, the issues appeared to had vanished.”

With things looking up for young Kade, he decided to throw caution to the wind and chase some more power for the FD. “I made the switch to a BorgWarner EFR8374 turbo mounted to a Turblown manifold with twin 40mm external gates. At the same time, I upgraded to four 1650cc injectors, bought a Radium Engineering fuel hanger to fix the fuel starvation issue, and three Walbro 460 fuel pumps were added too.”

In a situation that none of us wants to see, the car was on the dyno when the engine lost all compression. It was toast. The rebuild the previous owner had done used the cars original dented rotors and chattered housings. It appeared that the only new parts employed were the apex seals. If you guessed that he was pissed, you guessed it.

“I had no choice but to do a complete engine rebuild. The guys at Rotomotion took control of the process, starting with a 12.7mm stud kit, sending off the rotating assembly to Sydney to get balanced, clearancing the rotors and installing the 2mm SCR Power Seals.” At the end of the day, the 13b extend port motor developed a solid 531.6hp at the wheels on Flex-fuel E85. More than enough for street duties.

With all of that new power onboard, Kade decided to throw a fistful of cash at the suspension. With stance a priority, he opted for Fortune Auto 500 Series Coilovers with Air Piston Lift System and a tonne of HardRace components make the twisty stuff even more exciting. Nestled in front of slotted rotors are Kade’s favourite all-time wheel – Work Meister S1 3Ps. These are his third set over the years. Upfront is 18x9s (+22), and the rear wears 18x10s (+18) with decent-sized Nexen rubber. Project Kics R40 Iconix Neo Chrome Black Alloy Caps add a bit more wank factor for the fanboys.

With a race-inspired cabin from the factory, there weren’t too many upgrades needed in there. Kade settled for a Nardi deep corn 350mm suede steering wheel, FEED handbrake and gearshift boot, and FEED floor mats to match the black with red stitch, Bride Stradia Sport II seats. It wasn’t until the Fortune Auto air pistons that the interior took an about shift.

“Seeing as I needed to fit the dual Viair compressors and a large tank in the back, I decided to do a custom audio install at the same time. There was only one person I considered for the job – Fabian Augustine from Level Up Audio. He is an expert in the field.” The rear cargo area now contains two Audison 10-inch subs and an Alpine PDX V9 five-channel amplifier, as well as the suspension accessories. Ryan Lightbody, a mate of Fabian’s, did a stellar job on the hardlines. In the front doors, Fabian slotted in a pair of Morel Virtus Nano 602 splits. The slimmer woofer was required to fit the factory location. The sound, well, it is exceptional.

The body of the seven is a subtle blend of factory and aftermarket. Carbon fibre is abundant, appearing on the RE-Amemiya pro-style rear diffuser, the Angry Panda Odula-style wing blade, the JJ Carbon Re Amemiya front fender vents, AutoEXE side skirts and URAS GT front lip and, of course, as an insert in the RE-Amemiya style bonnet. Smoked lenses are a neat touch, as is the Car Shop GLOW rear taillight panel.

As much as he likes the look of the car at the moment, Kade still has some plans ahead. “I want to fit a FEED Widebody kit and then give the car a full respray. To accommodate the body changes, I will upgrade to 19-inch Meister S1 wheels and Willwood 6 piston brakes. Then I think I will have achieved my ultimate goal.”


KANE’S SLAMMED CHASER JZX100 is GHE77O AF

KANE’S SLAMMED CHASER JZX100 IS GHE77O AF

Photos by: Aubrey Hawthorne | Words by: Ian Lee

When you think of four door JDM cars there’s a natural gravitation to the Chaser platform. Sure Evo’s and STI’s also fit in this category, but perhaps due to their size, they don’t immediately scream out sedan as obviously as the Chaser. Don’t let the size of these cars fool you though, under the bonnet you’ll find the 1JZ power train which while overshadowed by it’s big brother the 2JZ, still packs a potent punch. With the first generation of these cars being released in 1976, it wasn’t until the fourth generation X80 in 1989 did we see the introduction of the inline six 1JZ motor. Like most high powered rear wheel drive cars in Japan, drifters soon took a liking to these cars and by the time the penultimate model was released in 1996, these cars had earned a formidable reputation on drift circuits. Just look up the infamous Daigo Saito drift jump on YouTube and you’ll be grinning from ear to ear.

While it wasn’t the drifting abilities that first caught Kane’s attention, it was the fact that it was a slick looking, high powered sedan. Taking influence from his dad’s affection to Ford Falcon’s, Kane wanted to be just like his old man. Though he had a few years before he had his own license, the next best thing was to drive a Falcon in video games like Gran Turismo. The problem was “there’s no Falcon’s in Gran Turismo so I settled for the Japanese version”. And so entered the Chaser into Kane’s life for the first time and he’s been in love ever since, eventually buying the one you see today almost 7 years ago.

The car originally came as a bone stock, auto, pearl white 97’ JZX100. Like many other owner stories on this page, the goal was to have the car serve as a daily driver so the initial mods were pretty mild in nature. Some HSD coil overs along with some CR Kai’s completed the look while a Greddy front mount setup and custom dump back was fitted on for some power gain. When the stock turbo puffed the last breath, Kane opted for a Garrett GT3076r which was promptly installed in time for the incoming R154 manual gearbox. A custom split dump and hot pipe from Fabulous Fabrications and a new tune finished what was by all accounts a fun daily with plenty of smiles to be had. Six months of smiles to be exact.

A rear end hit whilst on daily duties saw the boot and rear bumper become a bit out of whack. And while no one wants to have their car damaged, the silver lining was that insurance was happy to shell out enough cash to have the whole car resprayed. Along with the usual dings, touch ups, the car also got a Series 2 bumper set installed during the respray process to restore the car back to its pearl white glory.

Just when Kane thought he was out of the woods, the car unfortunately hit another challenge. Uncharacteristically to these usually reliable motors, the bottom end let loose or as Kane put it, “left the chat”. After deliberation on the build options, Kane decided to keep it relatively simple and opted for a OEM + rebuild keeping the standard crank, rods and pistons. All the weak points were remedied through some upgrades like ACL bearings, ARP rod bolts, head studs as well as a suite of brand new gaskets, pulley kits and pumps for the rebuild. The head also got a refresh and sports some HKS 264 cams, HKS adjustable cam gears, BC valve springs and retainers to get the most out of the VVTI engine. A new tune on E85 sees a very reliable 440hp at the wheels on 15 psi but future plans include running the motor through more boost as no doubt the motor has plenty more to give.

In what seemed to be an unending cycle of misfortune, Kane remembers that it was around this time that he separated with his long term girlfriend. “I was a bit lost as to what to do. Car. Car is what I’ll do”. Using the car to take the burden off his mind, work got underway to significantly change up the suspension to both tighten up and stance out the car in the way that you see it today. A stupid amount of money has been spent in this area of the car which at a partial level is difficult to appreciate. However once you step back and look at the car, it’s seamless and clean in the way it’s presented – a true indicator of a well modified car. 326 coilovers, DanyT and Dmax arms, Cusco braces and sway bars, Supero bushes; you name it and Kane’s probably got it.

While you probably established by now that the first respray above wasn’t the last given the pics, it wasn’t something that Kane was initially set on. “I was apprehensive about the change [but] the opportunity to do a full colour change came up and I kinda just went for it”. Knowing with the suspension done that the car could be lowered even more, Kane also got the guards cut more aggressively and the body panels pumped though the factory lines. The R154 box was also swapped out for a TR6060 6 speed which saw the whole engine and box both come out. Presented with the empty engine bay, Kane seized on the chance to shave the engine bay. With the body work done, the last bit to figure out was the colour which he eventually settled on a Lexus metallic grey.

The crowning piece to complete the new look was a new set of Work T7R2P wheels in 18×9.5 + 12 fronts and 18×9.5 +0 rears. The finished look is really something that can’t not be appreciated. Simply put, it is a very, very cool car to look at. The combination of the colour, aggressive stance and clean body lines really draw your attention from every angle. With performance and reliability to back it up, the car is almost near perfect and really has left no stone unturned throughout the process.

Though it probably isn’t anything like the Chaser’s Kane played with in Gran Turismo or the Falcon’s his dad is into, Kane’s chaser is something he can really claim as his own. Sure seeing Daigo Saito’s red JZX screaming down Ebisu circuit is a sight to behold, it’s almost as satisfying to see the clean silhouette of the JZX rolling down the city streets on a Friday night especially when they look as good as Kane’s.

Special thanks to his close friends Michael and Blake who have helped on the panel and paint work, Buckna from Simply Tuning, Brock at Leeson Engineering, Nathan at Fabulous Fabrication, Darcy for always lending a hand, Goelbys Parts, Michael at Bambullant Towing and lastly Jess his girlfriend for her unwavering patience throughout the whole build.

MODS LIST

– 440hp on gate pressure (15 psi)

– 1JZGTE VVTi
– Standard crank, rods and pistons.
– Balanced and blue printed.
– ACL bearings
– ARP Rod bolts
– Kazama engine mounts
– OEM Oil pump
– OEM water pump
– OEM gaskets throughout
– ARP head studs
– BC valve springs
– BC titanium retainers
– HKS 264 cams
– HKS timing belt
– HKS adjustable exhaust gear
– Colour Matched VVTi gear
– Shaved OEM intake manifold
– HPI style exhaust manifold modified to suit T3 flange
– Garrett GTX3076r rebuilt by Turbo Revival
– Fabulous Fabrications split dump screamer
– Darcy Gorman hot side pipe routed under chassis rail
– Darcy Gorman alloy radiator pipes
– Greddy LS intercooler core and cold side piping
– Leeson Engineering dump back exhaust with twin 3” tips
– Turbosmart dual port actuator
– Golebys 150A alternator kit
– Golebys under drive pulleys
– Bosch 1150cc injectors
– Turbosmart FPR1200
– AN fittings and hose throughout
– Hidden Vacuum block
– OdysseyFab catch can
– ChaseBays power steering bottle
– ChaseBays radiator overflow bottle
– Koyo Nflow radiator

– Tremec TR6060 6 speed
– Direct Clutch Services twin plate billet clutch with Ceramic discs
– Leeson Engineering adapter plate
– Leeson engineering clutch master adapter with Wilwood master
– Leeson engineering internal slave setup with remote bleeder
– Lesson Engineering chassis mount short shifter
– Leeson Engineering gearbox mount
Leeson Engineering tailshaft with billet coupler and 1350 uni’s
– TRD 2way with 3.9 gears

– Haltech Elite 750
– Haltech WB1 wideband
– Elite Gauge multifunction screen with can hub expander
– Re routed engine loom with twist off bulkhead connector
– Brand new sensors and connectors
– MAC valve boost solenoid
– 150psi Bosch oil pressure sensor
– Tuner by Simply Tuning

– ABS delete
– Braided brake lines
– Dixcel Slotted rotors and pads

– Work Emotion T7R2P
– Front: 18×9.5 +12 with Kuhmo ku39 215/35/18
– Rear: 18×9.5 +0 with Winrun 215/35/18
– Work Emotion blue valve caps
– 326POWER blue short wheel nuts with flat crown caps

– OEM Shaved Series 2 front bar
– OEM series 2 lip
– OEM skirts
– OEM series 1 rear bar
– OEM series 2 TRD rear lip
– OEM roof wing
– Highworks Custom Garage boot lip
– Windscreen washer squirted delete
– Widened steel front guards
– Widened steel rear guards
– Rear inner guards raised and tubbed
– Resprayed in Lexus 1J7 with metallic black roof and rear – lip highlights
– Mirror covers with inbuilt indicators

– OEM series 2 black interior conversion
– JDMRestoration Retrimmed series 2 steering wheel in leather and alcantara with red stitching
– JDMRestoration alcantara shift boot with red stitching
– JDMRestoration leather retrimmed Supra 6 speed Gearknob with correct shift pattern stamped to suit tremec 6 speed
– JDMRestoration alcantara handbrake boot with red stitching
– Black suede roof lining and upper trim panels
– All orange S2 bulbs replaced with white LED
– OEM S2 floor mats
– White LED footwell/door lighting

FRONT
– 326POWER coilovers 40kg
– DannyT 25mm extended lower arms with superpro bushes
– DannyT 30mm shortened Uprights, new bearings and hubs
– HKB extended studs
– KTS 30mm RCA
– Dmax adjustable castor arms
– Cusco adjustable upper arms
– Cusco sway bar
– Cusco strut brace
– Plated and reinforced subframe
– Superpro steering rack bushes
– Ae92 inner rack ends

REAR
– 326POWER coilovers 30kg
– Origin Rear uppers notched to clear axles
– Dmax camber arms
– Dmax toe arms
– Dmax traction arms
– Cusco sway bar
– Cusco Strut brave
– Andrew Schnieder solid subframe risers
– Andrew Schneider solid diff bushes

KANE’S SLAMMED CHASER JZX100 IS GHE77O AF

When you think of four door JDM cars there’s a natural gravitation to the Chaser platform. Sure Evo’s and STI’s also fit in this category, but perhaps due to their size, they don’t immediately scream out sedan as obviously as the Chaser.

Don’t let the size of these cars fool you though, under the bonnet you’ll find the 1JZ power train which while overshadowed by it’s big brother the 2JZ, still packs a potent punch. With the first generation of these cars being released in 1976, it wasn’t until the fourth generation X80 in 1989 did we see the introduction of the inline six 1JZ motor. Like most high powered rear wheel drive cars in Japan, drifters soon took a liking to these cars and by the time the penultimate model was released in 1996, these cars had earned a formidable reputation on drift circuits. Just look up the infamous Daigo Saito drift jump on and you’ll be grinning from ear to ear.

While it wasn’t the drifting abilities that first caught Kane’s attention, it was the fact that it was a slick looking, high powered sedan. Taking influence from his dad’s affection to Ford Falcon’s, Kane wanted to be just like his old man. Though he had a few years before he had his own license, the next best thing was to drive a Falcon in video games like Gran Turismo. The problem was “there’s no Falcon’s in Gran Turismo so I settled for the Japanese version”. And so entered the Chaser into Kane’s life for the first time and he’s been in love ever since, eventually buying the one you see today almost 7 years ago.

The car originally came as a bone stock, auto, pearl white 97’ JZX100. Like many other owner stories on this page, the goal was to have the car serve as a daily driver so the initial mods were pretty mild in nature. Some HSD coil overs along with some CR Kai’s completed the look while a Greddy front mount setup and custom dump back was fitted on for some power gain. When the stock turbo puffed the last breath, Kane opted for a Garrett GT3076r which was promptly installed in time for the incoming R154 manual gearbox. A custom split dump and hot pipe from Fabulous Fabrications and a new tune finished what was by all accounts a fun daily with plenty of smiles to be had. Six months of smiles to be exact.

A rear end hit whilst on daily duties saw the boot and rear bumper become a bit out of whack. And while no one wants to have their car damaged, the silver lining was that insurance was happy to shell out enough cash to have the whole car resprayed. Along with the usual dings, touch ups, the car also got a Series 2 bumper set installed during the respray process to restore the car back to its pearl white factory glory.

Just when Kane thought he was out of the woods, the car unfortunately hit another challenge. Uncharacteristically to these usually reliable motors, the bottom end let loose or as Kane put it, “left the chat”. After deliberation on the build options, Kane decided to keep it relatively simple and opted for a OEM + rebuild keeping the standard crank, rods and pistons. All the weak points were remedied through some upgrades like ACL bearings, ARP rod bolts, head studs as well as a suite of brand new gaskets, pulley kits and pumps for the rebuild.

The head also got a refresh and sports some HKS 264 cams, HKS adjustable cam gears, BC valve springs and retainers to get the most out of the VVTI engine. A new tune on E85 sees a very reliable 440hp at the wheels on 15 psi but future plans include running the motor through more boost as no doubt the motor has plenty more to give.

In what seemed to be an unending cycle of misfortune, Kane remembers that it was around this time that he separated with his long term girlfriend. “I was a bit lost as to what to do. Car. Car is what I’ll do”. Using the car to take the burden off his mind, work got underway to significantly change up the suspension to both tighten up and stance out the car in the way that you see it today. A stupid amount of money has been spent in this area of the car which at a partial level is difficult to appreciate. However once you step back and look at the car, it’s seamless and clean in the way it’s presented – a true indicator of a well modified car. 326 coilovers, DanyT and Dmax arms, Cusco braces and sway bars, Supero bushes; you name it and Kane’s probably got it.

While you probably established by now that the first respray above wasn’t the last given the pics, it wasn’t something that Kane was initially set on. “I was apprehensive about the change [but] the opportunity to do a full colour change came up and I kinda just went for it”. Knowing with the suspension done that the car could be lowered even more, Kane also got the guards cut more aggressively and the body panels pumped though the factory lines. The R154 box was also swapped out for a TR6060 6 speed which saw the whole engine and box both come out. Presented with the empty engine bay, Kane seized on the chance to shave the engine bay. With the body work done, the last bit to figure out was the colour which he eventually settled on a Lexus metallic grey.

The crowning piece to complete the new look was a new set of Work T7R2P wheels in 18×9.5 + 12 fronts and 18×9.5 +0 rears. The finished look is really something that can’t not be appreciated. Simply put, it is a very, very cool car to look at. The combination of the colour, aggressive stance and clean body lines really draw your attention from every angle. With performance and reliability to back it up, the car is almost near perfect and really has left no stone unturned throughout the modding process.

Though it probably isn’t anything like the Chaser’s Kane played with in Gran Turismo or the Falcon’s his dad is into, Kane’s chaser is something he can really claim as his own. Sure seeing Daigo Saito’s red JZX screaming down Ebisu circuit is a sight to behold, it’s almost as satisfying to see the clean silhouette of the JZX rolling down the city streets on a Friday night especially when they look as good as Kane’s.

Special thanks to his close friends Michael and Blake who have helped on the panel and paint work, Buckna from Simply Tuning, Brock at Leeson Engineering, Nathan at Fabulous Fabrication, Darcy for always lending a hand, Goelbys Parts, Michael at Bambullant Towing and lastly Jess his girlfriend for her unwavering patience throughout the whole build.


KASE’S LMGT2 EQUIPPED R32 GTR IS SERIOUSLY IMPRESSIVE

KASE’S LMGT2 EQUIPPED R32 GTR IS SERIOUSLY IMPRESSIVE

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

On a fine Queensland summer day back in 2010, Kase still remembers the day he got his hands on a car he’d been dreaming off since first being around them as a workshop mechanic – an R32 GTR. “For me, the shape, curves, styling both external and internal, the sound, the history… a truly iconic car”. Thrilled with his new purchase and with a clear direction on mods, Kase got to work partnering with Godzilla Motorsports and Mercury Motorsports to get all the right bits. The stock car was rapidly transitioned into a single turbo setup with a Garrett 3582R. With some larger injectors, high flow Tomei exhaust and 6 boost manifold, the car produced 350kw on pump fuel. Things were going good so far with the car doing its rounds at local cruises and open track days around Queensland.

Good things however aren’t always meant to last and unfortunately on one of his first trackdays after moving back to Sydney, the car had a bender – “it was one of the worst days ever”. A date with the concrete barrier saw the front end of the GTR crumpled and the car was immediately retired from the track and towed home. Luckily there weren’t any physical injuries but Kase was mentally devastated. After assessment, besides obvious panel damage, it was found that the engine was pushed up to the firewall and the chassis was completely twisted to the point the boot wouldn’t even close.

For many of the initial nights, Kase spent time pacing up and down his garage looking at his wrecked car and pondering his options. “It was becoming an eye sore to look at each night” he says. There were grand ideas to rebuild the whole car or transfer the parts to a rolling shell but eventually it was easier to just close the chapter and sell the car off to someone with more time and money to salvage. Stripping some minor parts as a memento, the car was sold and Kase was left pretty empty and itching to get back into the GTR scene.

In what seemed like an eternity, lady luck showed itself and presented a rare opportunity (even more so by today’s standards) to purchase a black V-Spec II. Owned by an older guy who had personally imported itself, the car was well kept with low mileage and some clean modifications. It was by all accounts a gem. After some VIN checks and searching on the GTR registry, it was uncovered that the car was in fact only a standard V-Spec – “It was doing my head in as the numbers and records don’t lie”. After some heated back and fourths with the seller whom was adamant it was a genuine V-Spec II, Kase took a punt and put down an initial deposit for the car. A genuine V-Spec still ain’t too bad, especially when you consider he picked it up for $23,000… Have time machines been invented yet?

Like the prodigal son returning, Kase made a one way plane trip to the Sunshine State to pick up his second R32 GTR. With the help of his best mate who picked him up from the airport, nervously they went to collect the car which met all expectations. The car was mechanically sound and came with HKS coilovers, Recaro’s, Apexi catback exhaust and a set of highly coveted Nismo LMGT2 wheels. The V-Spec II sticker remains on the boot but before you throw your arms up in protest, it is acknowledged by Kase that it doesn’t belong there. The reason for keeping it on for now is so as not to damage the paint underneath during the removal process as the sticker does look like it’s aged the same time as the car has been on the road. Stoked with the purchase, Kase made short work of the long drive back to Sydney where later that day, he picked up the same mate from the morning activities at Sydney airport. “We still argue to this day who got to Sydney first”.

In what you would consider a luxury in today’s car market, Kase got a second attempt to build a GTR. Opting again had an initial 500hp figure in mind on stock internals. Intensely scanning through forums and getting advice along the way, parts slowly started to stock pile over a four year hoarding period. With the pieces of the puzzle gathered, Kase landed on using Anthony and the team from Dahtone Racing to assemble the final image. Quickly becoming one of the more renowned GTR builders in Sydney, Kase said the reputation and down to earth interactions were enough for him to hand over the car, keys and parts.

An initial health check of the bottom end before work started revealed that the crank had some damage which meant the original plan of a stock bottom end wasn’t panning out as planned. Finding himself at yet another cross roads, the options were put on the table; 1) forged RB26 2) RB30 bottom end 3) stroker kit. Maybe tempted by Anthony’s car (which we’ve featured on this site in the past), Kase ended up going with option two saying it would’ve given the most cost effective solution to boost the cars power. Boasting a pretty exhaustive spec sheet, the highlights of the rebuild include a Precision 6466, Nismo intake plenum, Tomei 270 cams, Supertech valves, springs and retainers, Bosch 1650cc injectors and a flex fuel compatible setup. A trip to DVS Tuning after the build has seen the car push a neck snapping 572kw on E85.

Along the engine build process, the car got some aesthetic work done. An engine bay refresh was an obvious choice with the motor out so the car was sent to A1 Smash Repairs in Peakhurst for a respray. The MNP styled rocker cover along with the brushed titanium and aluminium parts give a premium but subdued finish to the car’s engine bay. Some carbon accents were added to the exterior of the car including a replica Abflug lip, side skirts, Attain rear exhaust shroud, Fujimura rocket dancer flap and a intercooler shroud. Although the car is black, the subtle glint of the carbon fibre weave under direct sunlight is a nice touch. The LMGT’s also got re-barrelled into a 10 inch setup. The polished lip along with the OG centre cap look incredible against the dark body of the car.

The interior maintains a very period correct style of modifications which will surely make any R32 owner envious of the Nismo catalogue display that Kase has collected. Nismo floor mats, rear mirror cover, pedal covers, titanium shift knob, leather steering wheel, 320km/h cluster and cigarette lighter all come courtesy of many years of slowly hoarding parts which when assembled together look right at home. A quick Google search for prices of these parts would make most grown men cry.

Six years on from the first GTR, Kase says he can somewhat rest easy knowing that while the first was and still is a memorable experience, if it didn’t happen he never would’ve had the opportunity to buy something more rare to enjoy. With the prices of JDM cars soaring year on year, future plans include nothing short of enjoying the car and driving it to close out a busy working week.

Special thanks from Kase to his wife – Lydia, the team at Dahtone Racing, Platinum Racing Products, A1 Smash Repairs, DVS Tuning, Just Dip It Hydrographics, Berlina Body Works, Leading Edge Detailing and the R32 GTR community.

MODS LIST

572kw on E85

– Engine bay re-sprayed
– Engine covers hydro-dipped
– RB26/30 engine build by Dahtone Racing
– Nitto pistons and H beam conrods
– ACL race bearings
– ARP 12mm head studs
– ARP main studs
– Platinum Racing Products RB30 block brace/AWD sump adaptor
– RB26 oil pump with billet gear set
– Tomei head gasket
– Tomei 270 degree 9.15mm camshafts
– HKS adjustable cam gears
– RB30 twin cam timing belt kit
– Tomei inlet gaskets
– New water pump
– Koyo radiator
– Custom made power steering reservoir
– Mines cam cover baffle kit
– Nitto cylinder head oil drain
– Platinum Racing Products cam and crank trigger kit
– ATI 750hp harmonic balancer
– Supertech single valve spring and retainer kit
– Supertech exhaust valve guides
– Tomei sump baffle kit
– Tomei oil orifice
– Precision 6466 single turbo
– Nismo intake plenum
– Enclosed Blitz pod air filter
– Plazaman intercooler
– Titanium bonnet stay
– HKS oil cooler and filter relocation
– Spitfire coilpacks
– Garage defend carbon fibre cooling panel
– Tomei oil cap
– RIPS racing oil catch can with radiator over flow
– 3.5” HKS cat back exhaust
– CWC alternator kit
– Battery relocated to the boot
– Frenchys dual pump in tank fuel system
– Walbro fuel pumps
– Fuel pressure regulator
– HKS fuel rail
– Bosch 1650cc injectors
– Flex sensor for E85 and pump fuel

– NPC twin plate clutch kit

– Haltech platinum pro ECU
– Mongoose M80 alarm systems with GPS tracker

– Stock Brembo brake callipers (front and rear) – Hydro Dipped

– 18 x 10 Rays Nismo LMGT2 rims with custom barrels

– Carbon fibre abflug replica lower front lip
– Carbon fibre intercoller shroud
– Ganador mirrors
– PIAA carbon fibre windscreen wipers
– Carbon fibre z-tune side skirts
– Attain carbon fibre exhaust shroud
– Fujimura carbon fibre rocket dancer flap
– Kansai front tow hook

– Recaro SR2 seats and rails (driver + passenger)
– Omori Factory leather boots for handbrake and gear shift
– Nismo short shifter
– Nismo titanium gear knob
– Defi turbo / water temp gauges with playback unit
– Nismo pedal covers
– Nismo 365A leather steering wheel with HKB boss kit
– Clarion NX706AU navigation head unit
– Pioneer sub/amp (TS-WX707A)
– Nismo carbon fibre mirror cover
– Nismo red fashioned cigarette lighter
– Nismo 320km/h dash cluster
– Kenwood tweeters
– Nismo floor mats (front and rear)

– BC Racing adjustable coil overs
– Stance air cups with air tank in boot
– Nismo titanium front strut bar
– Nismo rear strut bar
– Endless brake stopper
– Nismo reinforced clutch pedal bracket

KASE’S LMGT2 EQUIPPED R32 GTR IS SERIOUSLY IMPRESSIVE

On a fine Queensland summer day back in 2010, Kase still remembers the day he got his hands on a car he’d been dreaming off since first being around them as a workshop mechanic – an R32 GTR. “For me, the shape, curves, styling both external and internal, the sound, the history… a truly iconic car”.

Thrilled with his new purchase and with a clear direction on mods, Kase got to work partnering with Godzilla Motorsports and Mercury Motorsports to get all the right bits. The stock car was rapidly transitioned into a single turbo setup with a Garrett 3582R. With some larger injectors, high flow Tomei exhaust and 6 boost manifold, the car produced 350kw on pump fuel. Things were going good so far with the car doing its rounds at local cruises and open track days around Queensland.

Good things however aren’t always meant to last and unfortunately on one of his first trackdays after moving back to Sydney, the car had a bender – “it was one of the worst days ever”. A date with the concrete barrier saw the front end of the GTR crumpled and the car was immediately retired from the track and towed home.

Luckily there weren’t any physical injuries but Kase was mentally devastated. After assessment, besides obvious panel damage, it was found that the engine was pushed up to the firewall and the chassis was completely twisted to the point the boot wouldn’t even close.

For many of the initial nights, Kase spent time pacing up and down his garage looking at his wrecked car and pondering his options. “It was becoming an eye sore to look at each night” he says.

There were grand ideas to rebuild the whole car or transfer the parts to a rolling shell but eventually it was easier to just close the chapter and sell the car off to someone with more time and money to salvage. Stripping some minor parts as a memento, the car was sold and Kase was left pretty empty and itching to get back into the GTR scene.

In what seemed like an eternity, lady luck showed itself and presented a rare opportunity (even more so by today’s standards) to purchase a black V-Spec II. Owned by an older guy who had personally imported itself, the car was well kept with low mileage and some clean modifications. It was by all accounts a gem.

After some VIN checks and searching on the GTR registry, it was uncovered that the car was in fact only a standard V-Spec – “It was doing my head in as the numbers and records don’t lie”. After some heated back and fourths with the seller whom was adamant it was a genuine V-Spec II, Kase took a punt and put down an initial deposit for the car. A genuine V-Spec still ain’t too bad, especially when you consider he picked it up for $23,000… Have time machines been invented yet?

Like the prodigal son returning, Kase made a one way plane trip to the Sunshine State to pick up his second R32 GTR. With the help of his best mate who picked him up from the airport, nervously they went to collect the car which met all expectations. The car was mechanically sound and came with HKS coilovers, aftermarket Recaro’s, Apexi catback exhaust and a set of highly coveted Nismo LMGT2 wheels.

The V-Spec II sticker remains on the boot but before you throw your arms up in protest, it is acknowledged by Kase that it doesn’t belong there. The reason for keeping it on for now is so as not to damage the paint underneath during the removal process as the sticker does look like it’s aged the same time as the car has been on the road.

Stoked with the purchase, Kase made short work of the long drive back to Sydney where later that day, he picked up the same mate from the morning activities at Sydney airport. “We still argue to this day who got to Sydney first”.

In what you would consider a luxury in today’s car market, Kase got a second attempt to build a GTR. Opting again had an initial 500hp figure in mind on stock internals. Intensely scanning through forums and getting advice along the way, parts slowly started to stock pile over a four year hoarding period. With the pieces of the puzzle gathered, Kase landed on using Anthony and the team from Dahtone Racing to assemble the final image. Quickly becoming one of the more renowned GTR builders in Sydney, Kase said the reputation and down to earth interactions were enough for him to hand over the car, keys and parts.

An initial health check of the bottom end before work started revealed that the crank had some damage which meant the original plan of a stock bottom end wasn’t panning out as planned. Finding himself at yet another cross roads, the options were put on the table; 1) forged RB26 2) RB30 bottom end 3) stroker kit. Maybe tempted by Anthony’s car (which we’ve featured on this site in the past), Kase ended up going with option two saying it would’ve given the most cost effective solution to boost the cars power.

Boasting a pretty exhaustive spec sheet, the highlights of the rebuild include a Precision 6466, Nismo intake plenum, Tomei 270 cams, Supertech valves, springs and retainers, Bosch 1650cc injectors and a flex fuel compatible setup. A trip to DVS Tuning after the build has seen the car push a neck snapping 572kw on E85.

Along the engine build process, the car got some aesthetic work done. An engine bay refresh was an obvious choice with the motor out so the car was sent to A1 Smash Repairs in Peakhurst for a respray. The MNP styled rocker cover along with the brushed titanium and aluminium parts give a premium but subdued finish to the car’s engine bay. Some carbon accents were added to the exterior of the car including a replica Abflug lip, side skirts, Attain rear exhaust shroud, Fujimura rocket dancer flap and a intercooler shroud. Although the car is black, the subtle glint of the carbon fibre weave under direct sunlight is a nice touch. The LMGT’s also got re-barrelled into a 10 inch setup. The polished lip along with the OG centre cap look incredible against the dark body of the car.

The interior maintains a very period correct style of modifications which will make any R32 owner envious of the Nismo catalogue display that Kase has collected. Nismo floor mats, rear mirror cover, pedal covers, titanium shift knob, leather steering wheel, 320km/h cluster and cigarette lighter all come courtesy of many years of slowly hoarding parts which when assembled together look right at home. A quick Google search for prices of these parts would make most grown men cry.

Six years on from the first GTR, Kase says he can somewhat rest easy knowing that while the first was and still is a memorable experience, if it didn’t happen he never would’ve had the opportunity to buy something more rare to enjoy. With the prices of JDM cars soaring year on year, future plans include nothing short of enjoying the car and driving it to close out a busy working week.

Special thanks from Kase to his wife – Lydia, the team at Dahtone Racing, Platinum Racing Products, A1 Smash Repairs, DVS Tuning, Just Dip It Hydrographics, Berlina Body Works, Leading Edge Detailing and the R32 GTR community.


VINNIE’S 947HP RB26/30 VL IS A CULT CLASSIC

VINNIE’S MONSTER 947HP RB26/30 VL IS A CULT CLASSIC

Photos by: Jordan Singson | Words by: Ian Lee

Turbochargers are now a staple engine component in the majority of cars today with varying applications. Whether it’s to promote better fuel economy, generate more power or a bit of both, you’ll see turbo’s used in hatchbacks through to F1 cars and pretty much everything in between. While the commercial use of turbos has been around since the 50’s, widespread use of turbo’s in cars didn’t peak until much later. Australia in particular wasn’t blessed with many turbocharged cars unlike Japan for example. So for a long time, bigger was better and for many petrol heads Down Under wanting power, there was no replacement for displacement.

Enter the 80’s and the global fuel crisis. Fallout from this event rocked car manufacturers around the world as they were suddenly forced to consider more economic means of powering their cars. In response to this and with deadlines to release the new generation Commodore, Holden recognised their existing flat 6 was not up to scratch and decided to partner with Nissan to supply a motor, aka the RB30DET. With the car’s release in 86′, public perception and intrigue grew surrounding these new motors from Japan that could really cop a beating. In no time, people started lapping up the fabled VL Turbo’s and the rest is history.

Since then, clean VL’s (Calais in particular), have never been particularly easy to come by so when Vinnie posted up a WTB he knew he’d be waiting for some time. A few weeks later, Vinnie got his wish as he was approached by Neno (the original owner of the car) and just like that, Vinnie got a turn key street monster in a platform he’d been chasing for years.

The 86’ Calais started off as a rolling shell with Neno wanting to use a clean, original tagged chassis for the base of his most ambitious build yet. Having owned multiple VL’s in the past, including the highly coveted BT1, Neno was pretty familiar with how to get the most out of these cars and where most nuts and bolts went. Like most VL’s, the car was destined to be a crowd pleaser at roll racing events, Powercruise and anywhere that offered enough runway for the potent RB30 to stretch its legs.

For a car its age, the car is in pretty great condition with the body straight and both the paint and interior being accurately restored in a period correct manner. By today’s standards, the VL body may come across a bit square but there’s no denying they have that 80’s charm about them with those then futuristic lines, split tone paint and funky interior. But most would agree that it’s what’s under the hood that really grabs your attention when you spot these cars so let’s get right into it.

To get the most out of the factory RB30 bottom end, an RB26 head was swapped to help with greater response and top end from the engine thanks to the Skyline’s twin cam setup. Before this was meshed together the head got some TLC including a CNC race port and Camtech 282 camshafts. The bottom end also got some attention seeing a combination of Nitto and Carrillo pistons, rods and rings. Siemens 2400cc injectors, 3 Bosch 040 pumps and an Aeromotive 60L fuel cell help make sure that the thirsty setup never runs short of fuel. Strapped to this engine is a custom Garrett GTX42/45 (42 housing with a 45 wheel) hooked up via a 6 Boost Manifold as well as a Turbosmart Race Gate and custom 3.5 – 4’’ exhaust setup. Controlling all this hardware is a Link Fury ECU which with help from ESP in Canberra, has managed to extract a solid 706kw at 36psi. During the build process the engine bay also got a full wire tuck and shave at 12 Volt Performance to really hone the focus on the infamous red RB26 cam cover.

With the extra power, the 80’s drivetrain wouldn’t have lasted much abuse, so to safeguard this from happening a 2 speed Powerglide along with a TCE 5500rpm torque converter was installed. A single-piece tail shaft was also fabricated to link up with a Borgwarner diff along with the custom billet rear axles. Fitted to the rears are a pair of Weld Magnum drags wrapped in Mickey Thompson Street Radials. A matching frontrunner set of Weld Magnum wheels have also been fitted to the front to keep the look clean and consistent. For stopping power, an upgraded Wilwood brake booster has been added along with a VT front brake setup.

Aside from the obvious front Sparco seat swap, the interior maintains much of the original interior pieces. Even the original gear selector cover has been kept although now housing a B&M shifter. The dash which has done away from the factory mathbook grid line design to a custom Racepak IQ3 digital dash. Some handy wiring also has got the ignition lined up to a push button start for those modern creature comforts. Complimenting the seats and to finish off the interior is a matching suede Sparco steering wheel.

Six months on since Vinnie took ownership, it’s been a journey to just familiarise and gain confidence driving such a potent car on the roads. That said, with drag goals in mind, Vinnie says that the next round of mods will be to prepare for that which includes putting in a full cage, parachute and widening the rear setup.

Sadly, for many the golden era for Aussie performance cars is far beyond the horizon and despite the current ZB Commodore being a turbo as well, it just isn’t quite the same as the VL. Whether or not we’ll see a miraculous return from manufacturers like Holden or Ford, only time will tell but until then, it’s reassuring to see people putting in effort to keep classics alive and well.

Special thanks on the build goes out to Ryan Acworth, Megan – Neno’s patient wife, 12 Volt Performance, Extreme Street Performance (ESP) and Next Up Performance.

MODS LIST

– 706kW 947hp on 36psi
– RB26/30
– Siemens 2400cc injectors
– 3x Bosch 040 fuel pumps in a aeromotive 60L fuel cell in the boot
– R35 coil pack
– Full wire tuck engine bay done by 12Volt Performance
– Relocated battery to boot
– Relocated fuse box from engine bay to glovebox
– Hypertune inlet manifold
– Hypertune throttle body
– Hypertune fuel rail
– 6 boost exhaust manifold
– Custom Garrett GTX42/45 (42 housing with 45 wheel in it)
– Turbosmart race gate
– 3.5-4” exhaust
– Full CNC race ported head
– Camtech 282 cams
– Nitto forged pistons
– Nitto oil pump
– Carrillo forged rods
– Fire rings in the block

– 2 speed powerglide
– Tce 5500 stall
– Transbrake
– Custom single piece tail shaft billet yoke
– Straight cut gears in glide
– B&M shifter in car

– Borgwarner diff – cut down 74mm either side and braced
– TA diff hat
– 31 spline billet axles
– 1/2” wheel studs
– Full spool

– Link Fury ECU
– Custom switch wired in by ESP for low and high boost settings

– VT front brake upgrade
– Willwood brake booster

– Weld magnum 15×8.5 rears with 17×4 weld magnum front runners
– 255 Mickey Thompson ET Street R Pro Radial

– Series 2 grey interior
– Sparco front seats
– Custom dash with iq3 racepak street built into with custom indicator lights built into the panel
– Sparco steering wheel
– Push button start

– Boxed lower control arms
– Adjustable upper control arms
– All suspension dialed in by suspension dynamics in QLD

VINNIE’S 947HP RB26/30 VL IS A CULT CLASSIC

Turbochargers are now a staple engine component in the majority of cars today with varying applications. Whether it’s to promote better fuel economy, generate more power or a bit of both, you’ll see turbo’s used in hatchbacks through to F1 cars and pretty much everything in between. While the commercial use of turbos has been around since the 50’s, widespread use of turbo’s in cars didn’t peak until much later. Australia in particular wasn’t blessed with many turbocharged cars unlike Japan for example. So for a long time, bigger was better and for many petrol heads Down Under wanting power, there was no replacement for displacement.

Enter the 80’s and the global fuel crisis. Fallout from this event rocked car manufacturers around the world as they were suddenly forced to consider more economic means of powering their cars. In response to this and with deadlines to release the new generation Commodore, Holden recognised their existing flat 6 was not up to scratch and decided to partner with Nissan to supply a motor, aka the RB30DET. With the car’s release in 86′, public perception and intrigue grew surrounding these new motors from Japan that could really cop a beating. In no time, people started lapping up the fabled VL Turbo’s and the rest is history.

Since then, clean VL’s (Calais in particular), have never been particularly easy to come by so when Vinnie posted up a WTB he knew he’d be waiting for some time. A few weeks later, Vinnie got his wish as he was approached by Neno (the original owner of the car) and just like that, Vinnie got a turn key street monster in a platform he’d been chasing for years.

The 86’ Calais started off as a rolling shell with Neno wanting to use a clean, original tagged chassis for the base of his most ambitious build yet. Having owned multiple VL’s in the past, including the highly coveted BT1, Neno was pretty familiar with how to get the most out of these cars and where most nuts and bolts went. Like most VL’s, the car was destined to be a crowd pleaser at roll racing events, Powercruise and anywhere that offered enough runway for the potent RB30 to stretch its legs.

For a car its age, the car is in pretty great condition with the body straight and both the paint and interior being accurately restored in a period correct manner. By today’s standards, the VL body may come across a bit square but there’s no denying they have that 80’s charm about them with those then futuristic lines, split tone paint and funky interior. But most would agree that it’s what’s under the hood that really grabs your attention when you spot these cars so let’s get right into it.

To get the most out of the factory RB30 bottom end, an RB26 head was swapped to help with greater response and top end from the engine thanks to the Skyline’s twin cam setup. Before this was meshed together the head got some TLC including a CNC race port and Camtech 282 camshafts. The bottom end also got some attention seeing a combination of Nitto and Carrillo pistons, rods and rings.

Siemens 2400cc injectors, 3 Bosch 040 pumps and an Aeromotive 60L fuel cell help make sure that the thirsty setup never runs short of fuel. Strapped to this engine is a custom Garrett GTX42/45 (42 housing with a 45 wheel) hooked up via a 6 Boost Manifold as well as a Turbosmart Race Gate and custom 3.5 – 4’’ exhaust setup. Controlling all this hardware is a Link Fury ECU which with help from ESP in Canberra, has managed to extract a solid 706kw at 36psi. During the build process the engine bay also got a full wire tuck and shave at 12 Volt Performance to really hone the focus on the infamous red RB26 cam cover.

With the extra power, the 80’s drivetrain wouldn’t have lasted much abuse, so to safeguard this from happening a 2 speed Powerglide along with a TCE 5500rpm torque converter was installed. A single-piece tail shaft was also fabricated to link up with a Borgwarner diff along with the custom billet rear axles. Fitted to the rears are a pair of Weld Magnum drags wrapped in Mickey Thompson Street Radials. A matching frontrunner set of Weld Magnum wheels have also been fitted to the front to keep the look clean and consistent. For stopping power, an upgraded Wilwood brake booster has been added along with a VT front brake setup.

Aside from the obvious front Sparco seat swap, the interior maintains much of the original interior pieces. Even the original gear selector cover has been kept although now housing a B&M shifter. The dash which has done away from the factory mathbook grid line design to a custom Racepak IQ3 digital dash. Some handy wiring also has got the ignition lined up to a push button start for those modern creature comforts.

Complimenting the seats and to finish off the interior is a matching suede Sparco steering wheel. Six months on since Vinnie took ownership, it’s been a journey to just familiarise and gain confidence driving such a potent car on the roads. That said, with drag goals in mind, Vinnie says that the next round of mods will be to prepare for that which includes putting in a full cage, parachute and widening the rear.

Sadly, for many the golden era for Aussie performance cars is far beyond the horizon and despite the current ZB Commodore being a turbo as well, it just isn’t quite the same as the VL. Whether or not we’ll see a miraculous return from manufacturers like Holden or Ford, only time will tell but until then, it’s reassuring to see people putting in effort to keep classics alive and well.

Special thanks on the build goes out to Ryan Acworth, Megan – Neno’s patient wife, 12 Volt Performance, Extreme Street Performance (ESP) and Next Up Performance.


DAYLIN'S BBS EQUIPPED E30 IS AS CLEAN AS THEY COME

DAYLIN'S BBS EQUIPPED E30 IS AS CLEAN AS THEY COME

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

With little to fault other than lack of power and tired parts, Daylin’s E30 really had nothing urgent on the to-do list in its previous state. Sure, there were plans but he was happy to enjoy it the way BMW rolled it off the showroom. However when Hot Import Nights 2019 was announced, something must have set off a chain reaction as in a matter of weeks, Daylin transformed his car into an all out centrepiece.

Already acknowledged by Daylin as one of the best looking coupes of all time, he knew any mods were to stay true to the original body lines of the car. Other enhancements planned were to also compliment the car with some OEM+ hardware, more grunt under the hood and some aggressive stance to cap it off.

Starting with the motor, Daylin kept things period correct by sourcing a 325i M20B27 engine. Before putting it into the bay, some slight tweaks were made to crank the power output to 147kw at the wheels. This included fitting some aftermarket cams, pistons, injectors stainless valves and a Miller Performance ECU. A Remus exhaust caps off the power mods and really brings out a throaty engine note that you just don’t get with modern BMW’s. A 5 speed 260 Getrag, new performance clutch and LSD were mounted to the rest of the BMW drivetrain that Daylin had assembled and part one of the overhaul was completed.

For the body, Daylin added a full M-Technic body kit to the car which although is much more subtle than the M3 body, still dramatically increases the aggressiveness and sportiness of the E30. This is only further accentuated by how low Daylin’s car is which comes courtesy from the full air ride suspension setup. With a new body kit prepped in primer and the 30 year old paint looking tired, the car got a new lease on life and was resprayed in a custom dark grey finish.

By far one of the most eye capturing changes to the car is the wheel setup. BBS mesh wheels and old school Euro’s are a perfect and forever are a timeless classic.

The interior also got a dressing up during the build process and features some great upholstery work on the seats, shifter, sun visor, door cards and floor mats. The seats and door cards have been freshened up using the same dark red as what’s found in the modern day BMW M4. The carbon trim and covers on the bottom of the seat controls and M logo stitched into the seat are subtle and appreciated touches for those with a keen eye for detail. Diamond stitched floor mats are another piece of the interior puzzle which certainly bring a sense of luxury and a VIP vibe to the car without being overbearing and excessive in the cabin.

We’ve seen some pretty fast cars on this page but we’d be lying if we said fun cars have to be fast. Sometimes the enjoyment of driving is just being able to cruise in comfort and not having to worry about highly stressed engine components reaching breaking point when you put the pedal town. For me, Daylin’s E30 fits that bill and it’d be a car I’d be happy to take out for a coffee run on an early Sunday morning – what are your thoughts?

DAYLIN'S BBS EQUIPPED E30 IS AS CLEAN AS THEY COME

With little to fault other than lack of power and tired parts, Daylin’s E30 really had nothing urgent on the to-do list in its previous state. Sure, there were plans but he was happy to enjoy it the way BMW rolled it off the showroom. However when Hot Import Nights 2019 was announced, something must have set off a chain reaction as in a matter of weeks, Daylin transformed his car into an all out centrepiece.

Already acknowledged by Daylin as one of the best looking coupes of all time, he knew any mods were to stay true to the original body lines of the car. Other enhancements planned were to also compliment the car with some OEM+ hardware, more grunt under the hood and some aggressive stance to cap it off.

Starting with the motor, Daylin kept things period correct by sourcing a 325i M20B27 engine. Before putting it into the bay, some slight tweaks were made to crank the power output to 147kw at the wheels. This included fitting some aftermarket cams, pistons, injectors stainless valves and a Miller Performance ECU. A Remus exhaust caps off the power mods and really brings out a throaty engine note that you just don’t get with modern BMW’s. A 5 speed 260 Getrag, new performance clutch and LSD were mounted to the rest of the BMW drivetrain that Daylin had assembled and part one of the overhaul was completed.

For the body, Daylin added a full M-Technic body kit to the car which although is much more subtle than the M3 body, still dramatically increases the aggressiveness and sportiness of the E30. This is only further accentuated by how low Daylin’s car is which comes courtesy from the full air ride suspension setup. With a new body kit prepped in primer and the 30 year old paint looking tired, the car got a new lease on life and was resprayed in a custom dark grey finish.

By far one of the most eye capturing changes to the car is the wheel setup. BBS mesh wheels and old school Euro’s are a match made in heaven and forever are a timeless classic.

The interior also got a dressing up during the build process and features some great upholstery work on the seats, shifter, sun visor, door cards and floor mats. The seats and door cards have been freshened up using the same dark red as what’s found in the modern day BMW M4. The carbon trim and covers on the bottom of the seat controls and M logo stitched into the seat are subtle and appreciated touches for those with a keen eye for detail. Diamond stitched floor mats are another piece of the interior puzzle which certainly bring a sense of luxury and a VIP vibe to the car without being overbearing and excessive in the cabin.

We’ve seen some pretty fast cars on this page but we’d be lying if we said fun cars have to be fast. Sometimes the enjoyment of driving is just being able to cruise in comfort and not having to worry about highly stressed engine components reaching breaking point when you put the pedal town. For me, Daylin’s E30 fits that bill and it’d be a car I’d be happy to take out for a coffee run on an early Sunday morning – what are your thoughts?


A R33 4 DOOR THAT'S WORTH GOING INTO D3BT FOR

A MIDNIGHT PURPLE R33 4 DOOR THAT'S WORTH GOING INTO D3BT FOR

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

Had the Skyline name not become so tightly attached to the more favoured coupe variations or had 4 door Skylines taken on a different model name, perhaps public opinion may have differed. The sad reality for Skyline sedans are that they are generally third choice cars that end up being beaters, drift pigs or used for interchangeable parts for people who own coupes – almost always in that order too.

Truth be told, like many others, Robert’s hunt for a turbo JDM sedan led him down the path of initially searching for a clean JZX. By chance, he stumbled on the 33 you see in front of you which had just been pretty much built from the ground up by the previous owner, Miguel. After an initial inspection, Robert knew he wanted it and the next week it was his and who can blame him for instantly wanting this car. Now, given the car’s only been in his possession for a short while, much of this article will be about the build process taken by the previous owner. That said, Robert has got his own plans lined up for the car which we’ll get to at the end of the article.

The car was bought in reasonable condition with bolt on’s but had a poorly applied paint job that featured some dust throughout the finish of the car. Knowing this was going to be a project car, Miguel (as an apprentice spray painter) looked past the flaws and took the car under his wing to start his second project car.

With the car coming with some pretty standard engine mods, the more than capable RB25 put out a respectable 240kw at the wheels. This included a high flow GCH turbo, Tomei drop in cams, Nistune ECU, Greddy front mount and 1000cc injectors. Westside Mechanics and JEM were both enlisted to tidy up some of the mechanical items and do a flex tune on the car which saw the power rise to a solid 300kw.

But for Miguel, the power of the car was only the secondary goal during the initial build especially knowing that the RB is more than capable of power. Instead, the primary focus was to leverage his work experience to really leave his own personal mark on the car and visually create what he felt was the ultimate streeter. Miguel sought to it that he got involved in repairing and preparing the whole car for a refresh on life.

Taking up 6-7 days a week doing 8 hour days, Miguel with some help from other tradesmen after hours, stripped every bolt, removed all the glue, fixed dents, resealed, blocked the car and massaged the guards to fit the Enkei RS05RR’s (18×9.5 +22 & 18×10.5 +15). Body wise, Miguel opted to keep the factory aero bodykit and supplemented it with an Impul boot spoiler and KMAK BL front style lip. The car was then resprayed in Midnight Purple which incidentally was also introduced for the first time on the R33 platform. Finishing the respray, the car was then flowcoated, cut and buffed before lastly getting The Detail Masters to apply a Feynlab ceramic coat to the whole car.

Another eye catching feature of the car is the fully custom designed and impeccably assembled interior. Danny from Concept Garage led the work which started with some initial designs centred around the limited edition Bride Vertex Zeta III’s. The final result is a full black Alcantara interior with yellow/gold stitching accents to match the Vertex fixed back bucket seats. This colour scheme can be seen throughout the entire car including the shift boot, handbrake leaver and old school Momo steering wheel. Bride logo fabric is thoughtfully stitched into the door panels, roof and rear seats to top off an extremely tidy interior with a subtle hint of yellow that definitely suits the deep purple finish of the exterior.

With little to change, Robert says that he plans to make some adjustments to the suspension work including new coilovers and bushings. Besides this, he’s more than happy to enjoy the car although an RB26 down the line would be the long term goal.

A MIDNIGHT PURPLE R33 4 DOOR THAT'S WORTH GOING INTO D3BT FOR

Had the Skyline name not become so tightly attached to the more favoured coupe variations or had 4 door Skylines taken on a different model name, perhaps public opinion may have differed. The sad reality for Skyline sedans are that they are generally third choice cars that end up being beaters, drift pigs or used for interchangeable parts for people who own coupes – almost always in that order too.

Truth be told, like many others, Robert’s hunt for a turbo JDM sedan led him down the path of initially searching for a clean JZX. By chance, he stumbled on the 33 you see in front of you which had just been pretty much built from the ground up by the previous owner, Miguel. After an initial inspection, Robert knew he wanted it and the next week it was his and who can blame him for instantly wanting this car. Now, given the car’s only been in his possession for a short while, much of this article will be about the build process taken by the previous owner. That said, Robert has got his own plans lined up for the car which we’ll get to at the end of the article.

The car was bought in reasonable condition with bolt on’s but had a poorly applied paint job that featured some dust throughout the finish of the car. Knowing this was going to be a project car, Miguel (as an apprentice spray painter) looked past the flaws and took the car under his wing to start his second project car.

With the car coming with some pretty standard engine mods, the more than capable RB25 put out a respectable 240kw at the wheels. This included a high flow GCH turbo, Tomei drop in cams, Nistune ECU, Greddy front mount and 1000cc injectors. Westside Mechanics and JEM were both enlisted to tidy up some of the mechanical items and do a flex tune on the car which saw the power rise to a solid 300kw.

But for Miguel, the power of the car was only the secondary goal during the initial build especially knowing that the RB is more than capable of power. Instead, the primary focus was to leverage his work experience to really leave his own personal mark on the car and visually create what he felt was the ultimate streeter. Miguel sought to it that he got involved in repairing and preparing the whole car for a refresh on life.

Taking up 6-7 days a week doing 8 hour days, Miguel with some help from other tradesmen after hours, stripped every bolt, removed all the glue, fixed dents, resealed, blocked the car and massaged the guards to fit the Enkei RS05RR’s (18×9.5 +22 & 18×10.5 +15). Body wise, Miguel opted to keep the factory aero bodykit and supplemented it with an Impul boot spoiler and KMAK BL front style lip. The car was then resprayed in Midnight Purple which incidentally was also introduced for the first time on the R33 platform. Finishing the respray, the car was then flowcoated, cut and buffed before lastly getting The Detail Masters to apply a Feynlab ceramic coat to the whole car.

Another eye catching feature of the car is the fully custom designed and impeccably assembled interior. Danny from Concept Garage led the work which started with some initial designs centred around the limited edition Bride Vertex Zeta III’s. The final result is a full black Alcantara interior with yellow/gold stitching accents to match the Vertex fixed back bucket seats. This colour scheme can be seen throughout the entire car including the shift boot, handbrake leaver and old school Momo steering wheel. Bride logo fabric is thoughtfully stitched into the door panels, roof and rear seats to top off an extremely tidy interior with a subtle hint of yellow that definitely suits the deep purple finish of the exterior.

With little to change, Robert says that he plans to make some adjustments to the suspension including new coilovers and bushings. Besides this, he’s more than happy to enjoy the car although an RB26 down the line would be the long term goal.


JORDAN’S RB26 POWERED S15 IS THE PERFECT STREET CAR

JORDAN’S RB26 POWERED S15 IS THE PERFECT STREET CAR

Photos by: Aubrey Hawthorne | Words by: Ian Lee

There’s nothing quite like the first time you get behind the wheel of a turbo’d car and give it a bootful. And no, I’m not talking about your mum’s Golf TSI or your uncle’s turbo diesel truck but a car from the era where the boost coming on was an obvious change in the car’s behaviour and feel. The excitement of hearing the turbo spool, seeing the boost gauge climb and then suddenly, bliss, as you’re redlining down the back streets on your one week old full driver’s license. It’s definitely an addictive feeling that leaves you wanting more and for Jordan, this experience came to him nearly six years ago when he got to test drive his S15. Judging from the build of his car, it’s pretty clear Jordan got his fix and more.

When Jordan first got the car, it was somewhat of the workhorse car / fun daily for the previous owner who happened to be in the real estate. Test driving it from his friend, Jordan remembers opening the boot and seeing it filled with “For Sale” signs for houses – who said coupe’s couldn’t be practical. With his friend wanting to get something more fitting for a real estate agent, Jordan gladly took it off his hands in pretty much stock condition. No body kit, no accident history and just some minor engine mods to get more power out of the stock SR20.

Originally intending to put in an RB25 engine swap, plans fell through as the package he was intending to buy ended up getting badly damaged just before the purchase. So in an attempt to search for alternative transplants for his awaiting S15 engine bay, an RB26 from an R33 GTR came up and Jordan pounced on the opportunity. The engine had received a stock bottom end rebuild and for the 500hp goals Jordan had, he knew he had to do more than slap on a big turbo.

That being said, the new turbo, a Gtx3582r, was actually the first item crossed off his engine build check list because who doesn’t like to see a massive single turbo in their bedroom. Even if it can’t do anything, it’s almost a constant reminder to yourself of the amount of fun you’re going to have once it’s bolted onto your car. An accompanying 6 Boost high mount manifold was also purchased along with a 50mm Turbosmart Progate to finish off the turbo setup. After a quick engine health check and green light from Driftking Performance the head was stripped and sent off for a refresh which included Step 2 HKS 272 cams, HKS springs, titanium retainers, ARP head studs, Tomei gears, new head and intake gaskets and some porting throughout the cylinder head for better flow.

The bottom end got some additional love for a second time which included an N1 oil pump with Spool billet gears, new water pump and a Gates Racing timing and tensioner kit to see through additional power safely. With the engine assembled by the workshop, Jordan sought the help of some mates to help install the new beating heart into his car. Spending every spare hour he had after work and during weekend, Jordan along with his mates made the necessary adjustments to the S15 engine bay to receive the RB motor. This include the feat of routing the entire fuel system and fitting up the radiator, fans and associated hoses. For a weekend garage job, you’d be hard pressed to find too many faults in the end result.

With the engine in, custom cooler pipes and a full exhaust were installed by the kind folk at Elite Exhausts. Thereafter an R33 gearbox, DCS twin plate clutch and custom one piece tailshaft were mated together to finish off the drivetrain. Some custom catch cans and fluid tanks were also crafted by JMFabrication to allow the fluids to sit snugly inside the smaller engine bay before the engine management component was put in. Along with a custom engine loom, battery relocation and other electrical tidy ups, Whitey’s Wiring helped connect the final piece of the puzzle which was the Link G4+ ECU to get the car ready to hit the dyno. Opting for a flex tune, the car spent a good amount of time at Tekno performance where it now registers over 500hp on 19psi though Jordan already has plans for more boost in the near future.

Aesthetically Jordan has kept it clean with the addition of the RPF1 wheels (17×9+22 F 17×9.5+18 R), and a few minor additions such as the Dmax rear boot lip, carbon splitter and splitters up front. There’s not much to improve on this now iconic silhouette in all fairness and as we’ve said in plenty of builds on this page, sometimes simple is best. To get the rid height and handling right, the car has BC Gold series coil overs, Hardrace Camber, caster and toe arms front and back, Hardrace solid rear subframe bushes and Whiteline sway bars installed.

The engine bay however is a different story which although isn’t in your face, doesn’t quite feel as subtle as the exterior of the car. The teal finish to the engine cover is not your usual RB26 variation of red as is so often seen but it certainly looks at home especially sitting amidst the polished piping, catch cans, fluid reservoirs and Pewter Grey engine bay. The splash of subtle colour caries throughout other areas of the relatively stock looking exterior with the wheel nuts, brakes and tyre valves also in a similar colour to the engine covers. The Silvia logo on the spark plug cover is a great finishing touch to pair with the cleverly chosen “GODSILR” number plates to remind you this is still a S-Chassis.

Sitting in the cabin you’re immediately drawn to the AIM digital cluster which features squarely on the steering column. Besides the factory A pillar gauge, you’ll find no other unnecessary measurement devices in the car which to me is somewhat of an evolution of the current JDM interior where previously cars would have 3 or more gauges to monitor car health. Black Bride Low Max seats along with matching fabric inserts in the door panels are always an effective way to transform the interior and to match the red stitching of the seats and Nardi steering wheel, a custom dash mat was made to tie the interior together.

Despite owning the car for nearly 6 years, Jordan says he’s probably driven it for a total of 1 year both with an SR and now the RB so for the immediate future, he just hopes to make up for lost time with his immaculately put together car.

JORDAN’S RB26 POWERED S15 IS THE PERFECT STREET CAR

There’s nothing quite like the first time you get behind the wheel of a turbo’d car and give it a bootful. And no, I’m not talking about your mum’s Golf TSI or your uncle’s turbo diesel truck but a car from the era where the boost coming on was an obvious change in the car’s behaviour and feel. The excitement of hearing the turbo spool, seeing the boost gauge climb and then suddenly, bliss, as you’re redlining down the back streets on your one week old full driver’s license.

It’s definitely an addictive feeling that leaves you wanting more and for Jordan, this experience came to him nearly six years ago when he got to test drive his S15. Judging from the build of his car, it’s pretty clear Jordan got his fix and more.

When Jordan first got the car, it was somewhat of the workhorse car / fun daily for the previous owner who happened to be in the real estate. Test driving it from his friend, Jordan remembers opening the boot and seeing it filled with “For Sale” signs for houses – who said coupe’s couldn’t be practical. With his friend wanting to get something more fitting for a real estate agent, Jordan gladly took it off his hands in pretty much stock condition. No body kit, no accident history and just some minor engine mods to get more power out of the stock SR20.

Originally intending to put in an RB25 engine swap, plans fell through as the package he was intending to buy ended up getting badly damaged just before the purchase. So in an attempt to search for alternative transplants for his awaiting S15 engine bay, an RB26 from an R33 GTR came up and Jordan pounced on the opportunity. The engine had received a stock bottom end rebuild and for the 500hp goals Jordan had, he knew he had to do more than slap on a big turbo.

That being said, the new turbo, a Gtx3582r, was actually the first item crossed off his engine build check list because who doesn’t like to see a massive single turbo in their bedroom. Even if it can’t do anything, it’s almost a constant reminder to yourself of the amount of fun you’re going to have once it’s bolted onto your car.

An accompanying 6 Boost high mount manifold was also purchased along with a 50mm Turbosmart Progate to finish off the turbo setup. After a quick engine health check and green light from Driftking Performance the head was stripped and sent off for a refresh which included Step 2 HKS 272 cams, HKS springs, titanium retainers, ARP head studs, Tomei gears, new head and intake gaskets and some porting throughout the cylinder head for better flow.

The bottom end got some additional love for a second time which included an N1 oil pump with Spool billet gears, new water pump and a Gates Racing timing and tensioner kit to see through additional power safely. With the engine assembled by the workshop, Jordan sought the help of some mates to help install the new beating heart into his car. Spending every spare hour he had after work and during weekend, Jordan along with his mates made the necessary adjustments to the S15 engine bay to receive the RB motor. This include the feat of routing the entire fuel system and fitting up the radiator, fans and associated hoses. For a weekend garage job, you’d be hard pressed to find too many faults in the end result.

With the engine in, custom cooler pipes and a full exhaust were installed by the kind folk at Elite Exhausts. Thereafter an R33 gearbox, DCS twin plate clutch and custom one piece tailshaft were mated together to finish off the drivetrain. Some custom catch cans and fluid tanks were also crafted by JMFabrication to allow the fluids to sit snugly inside the smaller engine bay before the engine management component was put in.

Along with a custom engine loom, battery relocation and other electrical tidy ups, Whitey’s Wiring helped connect the final piece of the puzzle which was the Link G4+ ECU to get the car ready to hit the dyno. Opting for a flex tune, the car spent a good amount of time at Tekno performance where it now registers over 500hp on 19psi though Jordan already has plans for more boost in the near future.

Aesthetically Jordan has kept it clean with the addition of the RPF1 wheels (17×9+22 F 17×9.5+18 R), and a few minor additions such as the Dmax rear boot lip, carbon splitter and splitters up front. There’s not much to improve on this now iconic silhouette in all fairness and as we’ve said in plenty of builds on this page, sometimes simple is best. To get the rid height and handling right, the car has BC Gold series coil overs, Hardrace Camber, caster and toe arms front and back, Hardrace solid rear subframe bushes and Whiteline sway bars installed.

The engine bay however is a different story which although isn’t in your face, doesn’t quite feel as subtle as the exterior of the car. The teal finish to the engine cover is not your usual RB26 variation of red as is so often seen but it certainly looks at home especially sitting amidst the polished piping, catch cans, fluid reservoirs and Pewter Grey engine bay.

The splash of subtle colour caries throughout other areas of the relatively stock looking exterior with the wheel nuts, brakes and tyre valves also in a similar colour to the engine covers. The Silvia logo on the spark plug cover is a great finishing touch to pair with the cleverly chosen “GODSILR” number plates to remind you this is still a S-Chassis.

Sitting in the cabin you’re immediately drawn to the AIM digital cluster which features squarely on the steering column. Besides the factory A pillar gauge, you’ll find no other unnecessary measurement devices in the car which to me is somewhat of an evolution of the current JDM interior where previously cars would have 3 or more gauges to monitor car health. Black Bride Low Max seats along with matching fabric inserts in the door panels are always an effective way to transform the interior and to match the red stitching of the seats and Nardi steering wheel, a custom dash mat was made to tie the interior together.

Despite owning the car for nearly 6 years, Jordan says he’s probably driven it for a total of 1 year both with an SR and now the RB so for the immediate future, he just hopes to make up for lost time with his immaculately put together car.


A 1300HP R35 GTR THAT'S BUILT FOR FORM AND FUNCTION

A 1300HP R35 GTR THAT'S BUILT FOR FORM AND FUNCTION

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

The GTR has long been one of those iconic 90’s JDM car badges that along with the Supra have earned their stripes over the years as being thoroughbred and genuine “supercar killers”. A quick YouTube search for “GTR vs. Lambo” will return plenty of videos of supercar owners being surprised and often humbled by the performance of a car often more than half the price of theirs. So naturally, when the reintroduction of the GTR debuted in 2008, expectations were rather high for what the crazy engineers in Nissan had cooked up for the world. Boasting a blistering 3.2 second 0-100 speed and a 12 second quarter mile, the new GTR definitely commanded respect from the automotive community and for Tony this debut started his 7 year wait to finally be in the position to buy his own one brand new in 2015.

It took just three months for Tony to succumb to the urge of modifying his new GTR. Now what could possible drive someone with a car possessing these kind of figures and performance to want such a quick change? Easy, you take it racing. Tony says he had no idea how much of a competitive person he was until he took the car to a Downshift happy laps event in Queensland. Despite besting most of the races that day, a single and only loss was enough to drive Tony to the edge and vow to come back and never lose another race again.

By this time, the GTR had been in the market for about 6 years and the aftermarket scene was pretty established for this VR38 platform. So with some quick online purchases for basic bolt ons and a retune on e85, the car was back on the road with 450kw at the wheels. After a few more casual race events, Tony got introduced to the now annual Bullrush Rally and knew he didn’t want to rock up in a stock looking GTR. Some 3 piece forged wheels from Strauss, lowering springs and aftermarket exhaust with gold tips were ordered and the car pretty much stayed like this for two years. However, a semi-final elimination at Queensland Raceway during a roll racing event paired with Tony’s competitive nature would mark the beginning of a very long, painful and expensive journey to the car you see today.

With roll racing fast becoming a pretty popular past time for owners wanting to push their car’s limits, big power is a must and Tony knew his simple bolt ons were not going to be sufficient. With near 1000hp figures in mind as a target, Tony commissioned his workshop to assemble this package to the eye watering tune of nearly $35,000. A fully built HKS motor with new internals, crank, high HP rated intercooler and GT9000 turbos topped the bill. Other costs were allocated to transmission and supporting mods which included an Albins gear set, Dodson clutch kit, 2000cc injectors and parts from AMS performance whom have built quite the rep in the States for all things GTR over the years.

A 102mm FI valvetronic exhaust, Endless 6 piston calliper brake kit and upgraded carbon steel rotors capped off all the to do list as far as the mechanical side went. Not wanting to have to take the car off the road later to modify the exterior, Tony decided to freshen up the now dated MY15 looks by getting a full MY17 v3 body kit from Top Secret. The six month wait and price tag are probably the reason Tony’s car is still the only one in Australia to rock this particularly aero kit. Lastly, a set of hydraulic lift enabled KW coilovers were added to get the most from the body kit and wheel combo that the car has. The finished look really does improve the overall aggressiveness of the car particularly with the exposed carbon body panels, gold accented pieces and subtle paint work.

With a proposed three month build time for the engine, Tony was dying to get the car back to experience what a 1000hp GTR would feel like. Three months came around and unfortunately the car was not ready so disappointingly Tony waited for the build to play catch up. Another three months came and went and after that, yet another three months came by – something was clearly wrong. Alarm bells were going off in Tony’s mind and by the time he finally got the car from the workshop, things felt even more off.

After another twelve months of going back and forth with the workshop trying to diagnose the cars problems, Tony cut his losses and took to enlisting the services of Aaron from Precision Racing. Initial discussions and remote diagnosis indicated that many of the problems possibly stemmed from the Cobb Accessport ECU being used, not a big deal but frustrating none the less. Aaron and Tony agreed to upgrade to a Precision Racing GTR Motec package and with that Tony made the trip down to Sydney to get the installation done. Enter problem number two.

During the drive down the fully built, billet front diff decided to let go and just like that, $7,000 went down the drain. What was meant to start off as a simple ECU install now became an engine out job to replace the diff which by the way was returned to stock anyway. With patience nearing empty, the car after being fixed up with a new diff and ECU was finally ready to be re-tuned to rid the car of its originally problems. Once on the dyno and with boost turned up, problem three reared its ugly head and the car started pushing water and coolant out from the block and at that point, Tony had finally hit rock bottom for his dream build. The root cause as it turned out were the type of engine sleeves used on the block which as a result of removing too much material, actually cause the block to flex slightly and eventually push water when pushed to extreme power.

Not wanting to compromise and settle on a lower power tune to avoid pushing fluid, Tony went on to have many ‘spirited’ phone calls with the previous builder demanding answers and solutions to no avail. It’s often risky business when assembling a car to use multiple parties as if and when things go wrong, it’s often a finger pointing competition and unfortunately this was exactly what panned out for Tony. The original builder denied accountability for the failure and wiped their hands clean of any fault. Just like that, $35,000 was gone on an engine that had just passed run in mileage. Tony says that just recounting this experience gives him a whopper of a headache thinking about the most expensive 2000 km journey he’s taken in his life.

Left to assess his options, Tony figured the sensible routes were to: a) rebuild the head b) turn the power down c) return the car to stock and rid it. However Tony isn’t quite the sensible type and the resulting solution was as far away from options a, b and c put together. Putting his faith into Aaron and his team, the plan was to buy a completely brand new VR38 and rebuild this from scratch with a PR12 Garrett turbo kit. Advertised as a stage 5 GTR package, this kit basically turns the potent GTR performance into a mid to low 8 second car which includes all new conrods, pistons, cylinder heads, modified crank, billet sump and pretty much anything else you can think of. An increased 12 injector setup with 6 of them running ID1700 is hidden beneath the incredible looking carbon fibre AMS manifold that helps break up the gold in the engine bay.

To fix some of the clutch slip Troy was experiencing on the initial build as a result of the high horsepower, PPG drop gears and a 10+10 plate clutch kit with billet pistons and T1 rear diff brace were installed. The end result, a mind boggling 1300hp which Tony says has never failed to get a smile along with plenty of profanity from anyone who’s lucky enough to get a spin in his car. Oh and the cost of this? From Precision’s website you’re looking at $138k excluding the motor. Let’s just say after tallying the costs for the car, the gold theme becomes very appropriate.

When things go wrong with cars during the modification process, its very easy to cuss out, lose motivation and call it quits. This is even more amplified when the car you’re modifying already cost over $100k and you’ve just lost an additional $40k on a blown engine and diff so to that, I think there’s no denying Tony’s perseverance to carry on. Despite the setbacks, sleepless nights during his build failure and thousands of lost dollars, Tony says when he’s ripping it down Queensland Raceway he instantly forgets these past experiences and enjoys the moment he’s in. Tony would like to call out his thanks to Aaron and team from Precision Racing, Lucas from Vouge Industries, Cameron and Joshua Hill for the body work and most importantly his wife who’s been patient and supportive throughout the entire process, no matter how stupid it may have seemed at the time.

A 1300HP R35 GTR THAT'S BUILT FOR FORM AND FUNCTION

The GTR has long been one of those iconic 90’s JDM car badges that along with the Supra have earned their stripes over the years as being thoroughbred and genuine “supercar killers”. A quick YouTube search for “GTR vs. Lambo” will return plenty of videos of supercar owners being surprised and often humbled by the performance of a car often more than half the price of theirs.

So naturally, when the reintroduction of the GTR debuted in 2008, expectations were rather high for what the crazy engineers in Nissan had cooked up for the world. Boasting a blistering 3.2 second 0-100 speed and a 12 second quarter mile, the new GTR definitely commanded respect from the automotive community and for Tony this debut started his 7 year wait to finally be in the position to buy his own one brand new in 2015.

It took just three months for Tony to succumb to the urge of modifying his new GTR. Now what could possible drive someone with a car possessing these kind of figures and performance to want such a quick change? Easy, you take it racing. Tony says he had no idea how much of a competitive person he was until he took the car to a Downshift happy laps event in Queensland. Despite besting most of the races that day, a single and only loss was enough to drive Tony to the edge and vow to come back and never lose another race again. By this time, the GTR had been in the market for about 6 years and the aftermarket scene was pretty established for this VR38 platform. So with some quick online purchases for basic bolt ons and a retune on e85, the car was back on the road with 450kw at the wheels. After a few more casual race events, Tony got introduced to the now annual Bullrush Rally and knew he didn’t want to rock up in a stock looking GTR. Some 3 piece forged wheels from Strauss, lowering springs and aftermarket exhaust with gold tips were ordered and the car pretty much stayed like this for two years. However, a semi-final elimination at Queensland Raceway during a roll racing event paired with Tony’s competitive nature would mark the beginning of a very long, painful and expensive journey to the car you see today.

With roll racing fast becoming a pretty popular past time for owners wanting to push their car’s limits, big power is a must and Tony knew his simple bolt ons were not going to be sufficient. With near 1000hp figures in mind as a target, Tony commissioned his workshop to assemble this package to the eye watering tune of nearly $35,000. A fully built HKS motor with new internals, crank, high HP rated intercooler and GT9000 turbos topped the bill. Other costs were allocated to transmission and supporting mods which included an Albins gear set, Dodson clutch kit, 2000cc injectors and parts from AMS performance whom have built quite the rep in the States for all things GTR over the years. A 102mm FI valvetronic exhaust, Endless 6 piston calliper brake kit and upgraded carbon steel rotors capped off all the to do list as far as the mechanical side went. Not wanting to have to take the car off the road later to modify the exterior, Tony decided to freshen up the now dated MY15 looks by getting a full MY17 v3 body kit from Top Secret. The six month wait and price tag are probably the reason Tony’s car is still the only one in Australia to rock this particularly aero kit. Lastly, a set of hydraulic lift enabled KW coilovers were added to get the most from the body kit and wheel combo that the car has. The finished look really does improve the overall aggressiveness of the car particularly with the exposed carbon body panels, gold accented pieces and subtle paint work.

With a proposed three month build time for the engine, Tony was dying to get the car back to experience what a 1000hp GTR would feel like. Three months came around and unfortunately the car was not ready so disappointingly Tony waited for the build to play catch up. Another three months came and went and after that, yet another three months came by – something was clearly wrong. Alarm bells were going off in Tony’s mind and by the time he finally got the car from the workshop, things felt even more off.

After another twelve months of going back and forth with the workshop trying to diagnose the cars problems, Tony cut his losses and took to enlisting the services of Aaron from Precision Racing. Initial discussions and remote diagnosis indicated that many of the problems possibly stemmed from the Cobb Accessport ECU being used, not a big deal but frustrating none the less. Aaron and Tony agreed to upgrade to a Precision Racing GTR Motec package and with that Tony made the trip down to Sydney to get the installation done. Enter problem number two.

During the drive down the fully built, billet front diff decided to let go and just like that, $7,000 went down the drain. What was meant to start off as a simple ECU install now became an engine out job to replace the diff which by the way was returned to stock anyway. With patience nearing empty, the car after being fixed up with a new diff and ECU was finally ready to be re-tuned to rid the car of its originally problems. Once on the dyno and with boost turned up, problem three reared its ugly head and the car started pushing water and coolant out from the block and at that point, Tony had finally hit rock bottom for his dream build. The root cause as it turned out were the type of engine sleeves used on the block which as a result of removing too much material, actually cause the block to flex slightly and eventually push water when pushed to extreme power.

Not wanting to compromise and settle on a lower power tune to avoid pushing fluid, Tony went on to have many ‘spirited’ phone calls with the previous builder demanding answers and solutions to no avail. It’s often risky business when assembling a car to use multiple parties as if and when things go wrong, it’s often a finger pointing competition and unfortunately this was exactly what panned out for Tony. The original builder denied accountability for the failure and wiped their hands clean of any fault. Just like that, $35,000 was gone on an engine that had just passed run in mileage. Tony says that just recounting this experience gives him a whopper of a headache thinking about the most expensive 2000 km journey he’s taken in his life.

Left to assess his options, Tony figured the sensible routes were to: a) rebuild the head b) turn the power down c) return the car to stock and rid it. However Tony isn’t quite the sensible type and the resulting solution was as far away from options a, b and c put together. Putting his faith into Aaron and his team, the plan was to buy a completely brand new VR38 and rebuild this from scratch with a PR12 Garrett turbo kit. Advertised as a stage 5 GTR package, this kit basically turns the potent GTR performance into a mid to low 8 second car which includes all new conrods, pistons, cylinder heads, modified crank, billet sump and pretty much anything else you can think of. An increased 12 injector setup with 6 of them running ID1700 is hidden beneath the incredible looking carbon fibre AMS manifold that helps break up the gold in the engine bay. To fix some of the clutch slip Troy was experiencing on the initial build as a result of the high horsepower, PPG drop gears and a 10+10 plate clutch kit with billet pistons and T1 rear diff brace were installed. The end result, a mind boggling 1300hp which Tony says has never failed to get a smile along with plenty of profanity from anyone who’s lucky enough to get a spin in his car. Oh and the cost of this? From Precision’s website you’re looking at $138k excluding the motor. Let’s just say after tallying the costs for the car, the gold theme becomes very appropriate.

When things go wrong with cars during the modification process, its very easy to cuss out, lose motivation and call it quits. This is even more amplified when the car you’re modifying already cost over $100k and you’ve just lost an additional $40k on a blown engine and diff so to that, I think there’s no denying Tony’s perseverance to carry on. Despite the setbacks, sleepless nights during his build failure and thousands of lost dollars, Tony says when he’s ripping it down Queensland Raceway he instantly forgets these past experiences and enjoys the moment he’s in. Tony would like to call out his thanks to Aaron and team from Precision Racing, Lucas from Vouge Industries, Cameron and Joshua Hill for the body work and most importantly his wife who’s been patient and supportive throughout the entire process, no matter how stupid it may have seemed at the time.


SUPER CLEAN HKS 2.8L R32 GTR // MAY FEATURE

SUPER CLEAN HKS 2.8L R32 GT
// MAY FEATURE

Photos and words by: Jordan Leist

Jamie Paolucci’s taste in cars are very, very varied – try old and new Euros, VTEC powered JDM monsters and even some mid-90s Aussie V8 goodness all adorn the floor of his expansive workshop. Pinning him down to just the one style is impossible. I think this has a lot to do with his age. Years of loving cars as a kid, he has created a list of dream cars in his head, and he is slowly ticking them off. The love affair with this R32 started in 2015 practically by accident. It was during a late-night shopping expedition with his family that he became the proud owner of a new project.

“I was scrolling through Facebook when I stumbled across a mate’s car up for sale. I had always liked 32s, and the colour was a real standout. I couldn’t stop looking at it,” said Jamie. By the end of the Thursday night shopping trip, the girls all had new items for their wardrobes and dad was the proud owner of an R32 GTR.

“It was in reasonably good condition, I thought. The BMW Boston Green had originally been applied in Japan prior to being imported, and it was fairly neat all round. I planned to strip the driveline and reinvigorate the car with 20 years’ worth of evolution and turn it into a bit of a street/track bruiser that I could still drop the kids off to school in,” explained Jamie.

The mild tart-up soon became a comprehensive build and before he knew it, Jamie was well and truly in over his head. To begin with; the car was stripped down and carted off to Owen Ellis at Meltham Motors where the car was promptly rubbed back, and the bodywork was given some love.

With the car away on holiday, Jamie felt like he needed to achieve more, so he started to accumulate parts for the build. The first thing to appear on his credit card statement was a brand-spanking-new RB26 87mm block and head. The motor was also blessed with a HKS Step 2 2.8L stroker kit for some added displacement. A pair of HKS 272 Step 2 camshafts were added to the shopping list along with a whole heap of other HKS gear. Let’s just say, if it was in the HKS catalogue, Jamie bought it.

Induction comes from a Precision PE6870 turbo with a split rear housing, 3.5-inch dump, 60mm Turbosmart Pro Gate and a HKS Silent Pro cat-back exhaust. A healthy diet of E85 is maintained by ID1650 E85 compliant injectors fed by a Radium Engineering surge tank, and submerged fuel pumps while R34 GT-R coils provide the spark — the whole package is managed by a Link G4+ ECU. Cleverly, the surge tank, battery and ABS unit were all relocated to the boot and mounted on a billet tray. This provides easy access and declutters the engine bay to boot.

The cog-swapper is a 6-speed Getrag unit purchased brand new from Japan and is backed up by a DSC twin-plate clutch and 3.9 LSD differentials front and rear. A Trust drag intercooler keeps the intake temps manageable while the Koyo aluminium radiator and oil cooler keeps the fluid temperatures under control. Luke from Crazy Luke’s Speed Shop was assigned the task of fabrication duties. Notably, the custom-designed exhaust manifold, dump pipe, intercooler piping and catch can.

The combination of R35 GT-R callipers with AP Racing J Hook floating rotors are a welcome improvement over the old stoppers. The ultra-lightweight Nismo/Rays LMGT4 Omori 18 x 9.5-inch wheels are wrapped in Continental 265/35/18 rubber, and BC Racing ZR 3-way coilovers tied in with Ikeya Formula adjustable arms have the beast handling better than ever.

The interior, while reasonably well presented, paled in comparison to the now evolving engine bay and the smooth-as-silk green paint. Maintaining a JDM theme was paramount, but it also needed to be a clean, restrained approach – this meant no gauges/monitors mounted on the A-pillar or on top of the freshly re-covered dashboard. A battery of Defi gauges and ZD monitor were sent over east to Custom Clusters who fabricated the dash binnacle and centre console.

At this stage Jamie was convinced the car needed more: “I’ll be the first to admit, I really like the boy racer look, but it needs to be executed with balance, to be able to pull it off and not detract from the natural lines of the car.” Paul Nguyen from Solid Imports was given the task of sourcing some high-quality Japanese components to finish off the look Jamie was chasing. In addition to the already sourced Defi gauges, Paul located a pair of Bride Stradia Carbon Aramid seats with matching seat rails, and a Nardi Deep Corn suede wheel completes the period-correct interior.

Paul was also given an extensive carbon fibre wish list from Jamie, which included a Top Secret rear diffuser; Fujimura Rocket Dancer gurney flap, OEM boot wing, Nismo N1 boot lip, Abflug front lip extension, Varis bonnet and a Garage Defend cooling slam panel. “The carbon parts were just as I’d hoped but I wasn’t convinced on breaking up the paint on the car. Owen suggested including some green tint from the main body colour into the clear coat on some of the carbon parts. The gamble paid off in my eyes. At a distance to hue remains continuous, it’s only when you get up closer, especially in the sun, that you notice the carbon weave. The results speak for themselves.”

After having the car completed and driving it as much as he could, a good mate, Jarryd Thraves, somehow convinced Jamie that the 32 was better off in his garage. Reluctantly, Jamie handed over the keys and the rest, as they say, is history.

SUPER CLEAN HKS 2.8L R32 GTR // MAY FEATURE

old and new Euros, VTEC powered JDM monsters and even some mid-90s Aussie V8 goodness all adorn the floor of his expansive workshop. Pinning him down to just the one style is impossible. I think this has a lot to do with his age. Years of loving cars as a kid, he has created a list of dream cars in his head, and he is slowly ticking them off. The love affair with this R32 started in 2015 practically by accident. It was during a late-night shopping expedition with his family that he became the proud owner of a new project.

“I was scrolling through Facebook when I stumbled across a mate’s car up for sale. I had always liked 32s, and the colour was a real standout. I couldn’t stop looking at it,” said Jamie. By the end of the Thursday night shopping trip, the girls all had new items for their wardrobes and dad was the proud owner of an R32 GTR.

“It was in reasonably good condition, I thought. The BMW Boston Green had originally been applied in Japan prior to being imported, and it was fairly neat all round. I planned to strip the driveline and reinvigorate the car with 20 years’ worth of evolution and turn it into a bit of a street/track bruiser that I could still drop the kids off to school in,” explained Jamie.

The mild tart-up soon became a comprehensive build and before he knew it, Jamie was well and truly in over his head. To begin with; the car was stripped down and carted off to Owen Ellis at Meltham Motors where the car was promptly rubbed back, and the bodywork was given some love.

With the car away on holiday, Jamie felt like he needed to achieve more, so he started to accumulate parts for the build. The first thing to appear on his credit card statement was a brand-spanking-new RB26 87mm block and head. The motor was also blessed with a HKS Step 2 2.8L stroker kit for some added displacement. A pair of HKS 272 Step 2 camshafts were added to the shopping list along with a whole heap of other HKS gear. Let’s just say, if it was in the HKS catalogue, Jamie bought it.

Induction comes from a Precision PE6870 turbo with a split rear housing, 3.5-inch dump, 60mm Turbosmart Pro Gate and a HKS Silent Pro cat-back exhaust. A healthy diet of E85 is maintained by ID1650 E85 compliant injectors fed by a Radium Engineering surge tank, and submerged fuel pumps while R34 GT-R coils provide the spark — the whole package is managed by a Link G4+ ECU. Cleverly, the surge tank, battery and ABS unit were all relocated to the boot and mounted on a billet tray. This provides easy access and declutters the engine bay to boot.

The cog-swapper is a 6-speed Getrag unit purchased brand new from Japan and is backed up by a DSC twin-plate clutch and 3.9 LSD differentials front and rear. A Trust drag intercooler keeps the intake temps manageable while the Koyo aluminium radiator and oil cooler keeps the fluid temperatures under control. Luke from Crazy Luke’s Speed Shop was assigned the task of fabrication duties. Notably, the custom-designed exhaust manifold, dump pipe, intercooler piping and catch can.

The combination of R35 GT-R callipers with AP Racing J Hook floating rotors are a welcome improvement over the old stoppers. The ultra-lightweight Nismo/Rays LMGT4 Omori 18 x 9.5-inch wheels are wrapped in Continental 265/35/18 rubber, and BC Racing ZR 3-way coilovers tied in with Ikeya Formula adjustable arms have the beast handling better than ever.

The interior, while reasonably well presented, paled in comparison to the now evolving engine bay and the smooth-as-silk green paint. Maintaining a JDM theme was paramount, but it also needed to be a clean, restrained approach – this meant no gauges/monitors mounted on the A-pillar or on top of the freshly re-covered dashboard. A battery of Defi gauges and ZD monitor were sent over east to Custom Clusters who fabricated the dash binnacle and centre console.

At this stage Jamie was convinced the car needed more: “I’ll be the first to admit, I really like the boy racer look, but it needs to be executed with balance, to be able to pull it off and not detract from the natural lines of the car.” Paul Nguyen from Solid Imports was given the task of sourcing some high-quality Japanese components to finish off the look Jamie was chasing. In addition to the already sourced Defi gauges, Paul located a pair of Bride Stradia Carbon Aramid seats with matching seat rails, and a Nardi Deep Corn suede wheel completes the period-correct interior.

Paul was also given an extensive carbon fibre wish list from Jamie, which included a Top Secret rear diffuser; Fujimura Rocket Dancer gurney flap, OEM boot wing, Nismo N1 boot lip, Abflug front lip extension, Varis bonnet and a Garage Defend cooling slam panel.

“The carbon parts were just as I’d hoped but I wasn’t convinced on breaking up the paint on the car. Owen suggested including some green tint from the main body colour into the clear coat on some of the carbon parts. The gamble paid off in my eyes. At a distance to hue remains continuous, it’s only when you get up closer, especially in the sun, that you notice the carbon weave. The results speak for themselves.”

After having the car completed and driving it as much as he could, a good mate, Jarryd Thraves, somehow convinced Jamie that the 32 was better off in his garage. Reluctantly, Jamie handed over the keys and the rest, as they say, is history.


ABEWD’S ALL STREET SUPRA // APRIL FEATURE

ABEWD’S ALL STREET SUPRA
// APRIL FEATURE

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

A car and an engine that needs no introduction, the Toyota Supra and infamous 2JZ engine are engrained with JDM tuning and car culture. Ridiculously over engineered from factory, the kind folk from Toyota created a 90’s engine platform that even today can easily hold its own against most if not any modern day performance car. A huge boost to the Supra and 2JZ notoriety can be attributed to the Fast and Furious series which as most car people would know, was where Brian rebuilt from the ashes his famous orange aerotop. While for many this kickstarted their fascination and interest in the car, Abewd may have been that rare exception to the case.

See when Abewd picked up his first Baltic blue non-turbo supra, looks were what compelled him to buy the car. Having never watched the series at that point in time, the idea of a 2JZ was foreign to him – in fact, his original assumption was that since his car was a non-turbo it was a 1JZ! All he knew though was that the car looked amazing, sporting the aero lip spoiler and finished in a rather unique colour, this was all that mattered to him at the time.

When the search for his first Supra started, the car that caught his eye was a green, single turbo’d aerotop being sold for $27,000 (Abewd even remembers the seller’s full name) – talk about remembering your first love. The car had all the mods on it that he was after but the only problem as the cost was well over the price Abewd was willing to fork out. The car eventually sold and for years it remained off the radar while Abewd moved on to other Supra’s; still always wondering ‘what if’ and whether he’d have a chance to get the one that got away. Four years later, the car resurfaced and was again quickly sold before Abewd could get his hands on it but this time, he paid close attention to the car and its progression with the new owner. In its new home of Melbourne, the car underwent some big changes which included thousands being spent on the car to make it drag ready. A short while after these changes and with the right timing, Abewd made an offer to buy the car of his dreams or so he thought.

When the car made it to Sydney, the long-awaited feeling of anticipation and excitement quickly disappeared as on closer inspection, the car was not at all in line with the expectations he’d set for himself. This is perhaps partly because this was a long time coming in terms of ownership and also partly because he knew how much money had been spent in the previous owner’s hands, whatever the reason, Abewd felt he’d bought a lemon. A knocking, low compression motor, worn interior and paint, and to cap it off a notchy shifting on a virtually unbreakable gearbox gave the first few months of ownership a rocky start.

Not wanting to let this buying experience sour his romanticised view of the car, Abewd pulled up his socks and decided he’d make this car a platform and homage to the first Baltic Blue Supra he owned. Kass Bodyworks got started with the body whereby the car underwent a complete respray in and out to get rid of the original green paint and bring it to Baltic Blue. This wasn’t just a respray though as a number of body parts were added or replaced with near new (sometimes new) OEM parts such as the active lip spoiler, UK spec bonnet scoop, brand new body kit (front and read bumper + side skirts and mouldings), rare factory mudflaps and series 2 headlights. With the exception of the wide aftermarket CCW Classics wheels, the car presents itself as a clean, factory Supra – the exact look Abewd was going for. But for fellow Supra enthusiasts, he says that they’d know the subtle additions that have been put onto the car which make his particular Supra all that more unique.

As for the interior, you won’t find too many aftermarket parts and like the exterior, rare factory option parts were sourced such as the carbon steering wheel, TRD dash, knee rests, aluminium pedals, funky confetti floor mats and a pretty neat device called a conlight. After some Googling, it’s basically an optional light sensor that would turn the headlights on and off depending on the darkness outside – the things you learn! The doorcards, dash, roof and dashboard also got retrimmed during the interior rework for good measure.

Now I’m sure you’re not reading this post to know what was done to the exterior or interior of a Supra because let’s be honest, as far as iconic JDM cars go, there is very little to improve on from the factory finish that Toyota bestowed onto this car. You’re here to gush over the 2JZ in all its high boost glory. To cut to the chase, the car produces a whopping 750hp on its current low boost setting of 23psi however the turbo and supporting mods are rated to over 40psi. Now a days, 1000hp Supra’s are not uncommon and seem to be the bare minimum expectation as far as the internet is concerned. The reality is that even with strong foundations, there still needs to be appropriate levels of mechanical and engineering planning required to produce the power in a safe and reliable manner.

Calling on Motorsport Mechanical, 4mance Automotive and JEM, the direction of the build was to retain the factory 3 litre displacement and work on strengthening both the bottom and top end as well as the addition of a massive Precision 6870 turbo. The final build included (starting from the bottom end); ACL bearings, Spool rods, CP pistons, ARP studs, BC stage 3 cams, 6 boost manifold, an assortment of replacement OEM parts (such as tensioners, pumps and gaskets) and much more. For fuelling, the car is running three e85 compatible Walbro 460 pumps and X-purt 1550cc injectors. Haltech hardware throughout was used for engine management to orchestrate the entire package and get the most out of the engine and supporting mods. As for that pesky gearbox, Abewd opted for a brand new v161 along with an RPS twin plate clutch that should see the power get to the wheels for years to come.

The finished car is something that spurs mixed emotions for Abewd given the initial disappointment but every time he gets behind the wheel, he knows the pain was worth it in the end. As far as plans for the car goes, Abewd says he’s happy to enjoy dailying it for a while and potentially export it to the US through his export business “All Street” that specialise in Supra exportation to make way for other project cars.

ABEWD’S ALL STREET SUPRA // APRIL FEATURE

A car and an engine that needs no introduction, the Toyota Supra and infamous 2JZ engine are engrained with JDM tuning and car culture. Ridiculously over engineered from factory, the kind folk from Toyota created a 90’s engine platform that even today can easily hold its own against most if not any modern day performance car. A huge boost to the Supra and 2JZ notoriety can be attributed to the Fast and Furious series which as most car people would know, was where Brian rebuilt from the ashes his famous orange aerotop. While for many this kickstarted their fascination and interest in the car, Abewd may have been that rare exception to the case.

See when Abewd picked up his first Baltic blue non-turbo supra, looks were what compelled him to buy the car. Having never watched the series at that point in time, the idea of a 2JZ was foreign to him – in fact, his original assumption was that since his car was a non-turbo it was a 1JZ! All he knew though was that the car looked amazing, sporting the aero lip spoiler and finished in a rather unique colour, this was all that mattered to him at the time.

When the search for his first Supra started, the car that caught his eye was a green, single turbo’d aerotop being sold for $27,000 (Abewd even remembers the seller’s full name) – talk about remembering your first love. The car had all the mods on it that he was after but the only problem as the cost was well over the price Abewd was willing to fork out. The car eventually sold and for years it remained off the radar while Abewd moved on to other Supra’s; still always wondering ‘what if’ and whether he’d have a chance to get the one that got away.

Four years later, the car resurfaced and was again quickly sold before Abewd could get his hands on it but this time, he paid close attention to the car and its progression with the new owner. In its new home of Melbourne, the car underwent some big changes which included thousands being spent on the car to make it drag ready. A short while after these changes and with the right timing, Abewd made an offer to buy the car of his dreams or so he thought.

When the car made it to Sydney, the long-awaited feeling of anticipation and excitement quickly disappeared as on closer inspection, the car was not at all in line with the expectations he’d set for himself. This is perhaps partly because this was a long time coming in terms of ownership and also partly because he knew how much money had been spent in the previous owner’s hands, whatever the reason, Abewd felt he’d bought a lemon. A knocking, low compression motor, worn interior and paint, and to cap it off a notchy shifting on a virtually unbreakable gearbox gave the first few months of ownership a rocky start.

Not wanting to let this buying experience sour his romanticised view of the car, Abewd pulled up his socks and decided he’d make this car a platform and homage to the first Baltic Blue Supra he owned. Kass Bodyworks got started with the body whereby the car underwent a complete respray in and out to get rid of the original green paint and bring it to Baltic Blue. This wasn’t just a respray though as a number of body parts were added or replaced with near new (sometimes new) OEM parts such as the active lip spoiler, UK spec bonnet scoop, brand new body kit (front and read bumper + side skirts and mouldings), rare factory mudflaps and series 2 headlights. With the exception of the wide aftermarket CCW Classics wheels, the car presents itself as a clean, factory Supra – the exact look Abewd was going for.

But for fellow Supra enthusiasts, he says that they’d know the subtle additions that have been put onto the car which make his particular Supra all that more unique. As for the interior, you won’t find too many aftermarket parts and like the exterior, rare factory option parts were sourced such as the carbon steering wheel, TRD dash, knee rests, aluminium pedals, funky confetti floor mats and a pretty neat device called a conlight. After some Googling, it’s basically an optional light sensor that would turn the headlights on and off depending on the darkness outside – the things you learn! The doorcards, dash, roof and dashboard also got retrimmed during the interior rework for good measure.

Now I’m sure you’re not reading this post to know what was done to the exterior or interior of a Supra because let’s be honest, as far as iconic JDM cars go, there is very little to improve on from the factory finish that Toyota bestowed onto this car. You’re here to gush over the 2JZ in all its high boost glory. To cut to the chase, the car produces a whopping 750hp on its current low boost setting of 23psi however the turbo and supporting mods are rated to over 40psi.

Now a days, 1000hp Supra’s are not uncommon and seem to be the bare minimum expectation as far as the internet is concerned. The reality is that even with strong foundations, there still needs to be appropriate levels of mechanical and engineering planning required to produce the power in a safe and reliable manner.

Calling on Motorsport Mechanical, 4mance Automotive and JEM, the direction of the build was to retain the factory 3 litre displacement and work on strengthening both the bottom and top end as well as the addition of a massive Precision 6870 turbo. The final build included (starting from the bottom end); ACL bearings, Spool rods, CP pistons, ARP studs, BC stage 3 cams, 6 boost manifold, an assortment of replacement OEM parts (such as tensioners, pumps and gaskets) and much, much more.

For fuelling, the car is running three e85 compatible Walbro 460 pumps and X-purt 1550cc injectors. Haltech hardware throughout was used for engine management to orchestrate the entire package and get the most out of the engine and supporting mods. As for that pesky gearbox, Abewd opted for a brand new v161 along with an RPS twin plate clutch that should see the power get to the wheels for years to come.

The finished car is something that spurs mixed emotions for Abewd given the initial disappointment but every time he gets behind the wheel, he knows the pain was worth it in the end. As far as plans for the car goes, Abewd says he’s happy to enjoy dailying it for a while and potentially export it to the US through his export business “All Street” that specialise in Supra exportation to make way for other project cars.