DENIS’S 1JZ SWAPPED BMW E30 // OCTOBER FEATURE

DENIS’S 1JZ SWAPPED BMW E30
// OCTOBER FEATURE

Photos by: Alan Luy | Words by: Ian Lee

4 years of ownership, a life time obsession, a mountain of fried tyres, and a car that’s been transformed from drift pig to prized show pony. This is the story of Denis’s 1JZ swapped 1986 BMW E30.

A cult hero in the euro scene, the BMW E30 chassis is one of the more iconic older generation European performance cars that has sustained its prestige and appeal throughout the generations since its release back in the early 80’s. Back then, the crème of the crop from this chassis was of course the M3. Producing around 150kw from it’s inline 4, 2.5 litre motor, these cars were fast and had a mean presence on the German roads with their flared body work and big rear spoiler. However, just like other older classic European performance cars, the value of M3’s has increased significantly. A quick Carsales check shows only two listed for around $80k!

At 18, Denis conceded that owning his dream E30 M3 wasn’t meant to be given the eye watering prices they were demanding. Instead, he settled on a 1984 E30 sedan that his grandpa and parents bought for $2000. While not an M3 the E30 body still has a unique silhouette and style that can be appreciated and for what it’s worth, ownership of the sedan allowed Denis to really familiarise himself with the chassis. Tearing down and tinkering with it to know all the ins and outs of the car; I’m not sure Denis would have the heart to do this on a genuine E30 M3!

Like any young car enthusiast, after the fun of the initial purchase died down, Denis wanted his car to go fast and he wanted it to happen yesterday. Fuelled by his growing interest in drifting, the humble Bavarian motor in his sedan would barely break traction yet along go sideways at 80km/h. Determined that there was a way to pair his passion of E30’s and drifting, Denis searched for the right opportunity.

The right opportunity eventually presented itself but it wasn’t without a twist that required some patience and some crafty convincing on Denis’s part. Through the E30 community, a friend by the name of Alex based in QLD, who also shared a passion for drifting had actually built a drift purpose E30 coupe. A build that was 9 years in the making, it checked off all of what Denis wanted, the right body (albeit a bit rough around the edges), the right suspension setup for drifting, and most importantly the right powerplant thanks to the 1JZ engine swap. The stars seemed to align however the twist in this story was that while Alex did sell the car, it wasn’t to Denis, well not the first time anyway.

To cut a long story short, Alex sold the car to a guy, who sold the car to another guy, who then sold the car back to Alex. Make sense? So with Alex back in ownership of his original project car, Denis found out through conversation that Alex was actually on the lookout for an E30 M3. Sensing the opportunity, Denis set off like a blood hound to find an M3.

Amazingly he was able to scout a mint, untouched, undriven E30 M3 based in Melbourne and with that, the jigsaw pieces fell into place. After a few months of convincing, Alex agreed to sell his 1JZ swapped E30 to Denis and trailered down the car to Melbourne to then pick up the M3 that Denis had found for him.

With the right car finally in his ownership, Denis got to work to make his own mark the BMW. The interior saw a race inspired overhaul consisting of fixed back Sparco seats, suede wrapped panels and an assortment of various Defi gauges sitting snugly in the dash to help monitor all the car’s vitals through an intense drifting session. Rather than pairing the car with a set of European wheels, Denis decided on opting for a custom set of Japanese Impul Hoshino G5’s in 15×10 -0 offset all round giving it a great overall stance and classic car aesthetic. The car was then capped off with a completely new front steering setup including a quick ratio steering rack, control arms and SLR speed kit which made sure that when this thing hit the turns, it was hitting them hard.

With these improvements made, the car saw a good couple years of drifting on the track. Denis says the car has never missed a beat thanks to the sound reliability of the 1JZ motor and tune which to his knowledge, has been unchanged for the last 6 years! It’s really no surprise that the JZ motors are so commonly used in the drift scene. The motor is bundled with a Garett 3076R, 6 boost manifold, Sard 880cc injectors, 50mm wastegate and HKS cams to make just over 400hp at 21psi all day, every day. For the transmission, an R154 gearbox with OS Giken clutch and flywheel put power to the rear 2 way Kaaz LSD via a custom 3 inch tail shaft.

After the drifting accolades and battle scars on the car started building up, Denis eventually started to feel a bit bad for the old girl and decided it was time to hang up the boots for the car in terms of drifting duties. Instead he wanted his E30 to be a show car, something that he was able to proudly put on display and allow others to appreciate what he saw in the E30’s as an 18 year old. Denis enlisted the help of DT Panels in Melbourne to help refresh the car’s tired exterior which resulted in a full respray in BMW E39 Mineral Grey. The genuine Mtech 1 body kit, seamlessly flared guards, front lip and boot spoiler make for a tidy finished product that with the hood closed, hides any trace of the true origins of the car.

With another E30 drift car in the making and a newly acquired S13, Denis hopes to allow this BMW a much needed retirement as a street / show car that’s able to pay homage to a bygone era of performance European cars that with the right mods can still hold their own today.

MODS LIST

– Non vvti 1jz gte
– 6 boost exhaust manifold
– Garrett gtx3076r
– Turbosmart 50mm wastegate
– Custom 3” exhaust with blast pipes
– Koyo radiator with twin thermos
– HKS cams and cam gears
– Custom made intake manifold
– Sard 880cc injectors
– Custom cam covers
– Custom catch can
– PWR intercooler with custom 1 piece piping
– 40L fuel cell
– Holley blue lift pump
– 2.5L surge tank
– Bosch 044 feed pump
– Whole car is done in braided hoses and speedflow fittings

– R154 gearbox
– OS giken triple plate clutch
– Custom made 3” tail shaft
– Kaaz 2 way lsd diff

– Motec m48 pro ecu
– Motec ignition expander
– Motec loom and sensors

– E32 hydraulic booster
– Braided lines
– E30 6 cyl drilled and slotted rotors
– Chasebays hydraulic handbrake
– Custom lines
– Twin caliper rear setup
– Wilwood calipers

– Custom made 15×10 -/+0 Impul Hoshino G5
Always run toyo r1r semi slicks for front but atm it’s on nankang ar1
Rear usually Jinyu

— Custom made metal flares with shaved guards
– Full respray in BMW B39 Mineral Grey
– Genuine mtech 1 full bodykit
– Custom roof spoiler lip
– Custom front splitter lip
– Slightly tinted headlights
– Custom rear tail lights

– Sparco sprint V seats
– Custom suede trimmed dash, centre console, rear seat delete
– Flake red rollcage
– Custom cluster with defi white series gauges
– Nardi steering wheel
– Custom snap-on shifter

– Cusco 10kg front coilovers
– Tein 8kg rx7 coilovers modified to fit e30 and converted to “true” coilover type
– Custom front and rear strut brace
– Custom extended control arms
– SLR “mini kit” and lollipops

DENIS’S 1JZ SWAPPED BMW E30 // OCTOBER FEATURE

4 years of ownership, a life time obsession, a mountain of fried tyres, and a car that’s been transformed from drift pig to prized show pony. This is the story of Denis’s 1JZ swapped 1986 BMW E30.

A cult hero in the euro scene, the BMW E30 chassis is one of the more iconic older generation European performance cars that has sustained its prestige and appeal throughout the generations since its release back in the early 80’s. Back then, the crème of the crop from this chassis was of course the M3.

Producing around 150kw from it’s inline 4, 2.5 litre motor, these cars were fast and had a mean presence on the German roads with their flared body work and big rear spoiler. However, just like other older classic European performance cars, the value of M3’s has increased significantly. A quick Carsales check shows only two listed for around $80k!

At 18, Denis conceded that owning his dream E30 M3 wasn’t meant to be given the eye watering prices they were demanding. Instead, he settled on a 1984 E30 sedan that his grandpa and parents bought for $2000.

While not an M3 the E30 body still has a unique silhouette and style that can be appreciated and for what it’s worth, ownership of the sedan allowed Denis to really familiarise himself with the chassis. Tearing down and tinkering with it to know all the ins and outs of the car; I’m not sure Denis would have the heart to do this on a genuine E30 M3!

Like any young car enthusiast, after the fun of the initial purchase died down, Denis wanted his car to go fast and he wanted it to happen yesterday. Fuelled by his growing interest in drifting, the humble Bavarian motor in his sedan would barely break traction yet along go sideways at 80km/h. Determined that there was a way to pair his passion of E30’s and drifting, Denis searched for the right opportunity.

The right opportunity eventually presented itself but it wasn’t without a twist that required some patience and some crafty convincing on Denis’s part. Through the E30 community, a friend by the name of Alex based in QLD, who also shared a passion for drifting had actually built a drift purpose E30.

A build that was 9 years in the making, it checked off all of what Denis wanted, the right body (albeit a bit rough around the edges), the right suspension setup for drifting, and most importantly the right powerplant thanks to the 1JZ engine swap. The stars seemed to align however the twist in this story was that while Alex did sell the car, it wasn’t to Denis, well not the first time anyway.

To cut a long story short, Alex sold the car to a guy, who sold the car to another guy, who then sold the car back to Alex. Make sense? So with Alex back in ownership of his original project car, Denis found out through conversation that Alex was actually on the lookout for an E30 M3. Sensing the opportunity, Denis set off like a blood hound to find an M3.

Amazingly he was able to scout a mint, untouched, undriven E30 M3 based in Melbourne and with that, the jigsaw pieces fell into place. After a few months of convincing, Alex agreed to sell his 1JZ swapped E30 to Denis and trailered down the car to Melbourne to then pick up the M3 that Denis had found for him.

With the right car finally in his ownership, Denis got to work to make his own mark the BMW. The interior saw a race inspired overhaul consisting of fixed back Sparco seats, suede wrapped panels and an assortment of various Defi gauges sitting snugly in the dash to help monitor all the car’s vitals through an intense drifting session.

Rather than pairing the car with a set of European wheels, Denis decided on opting for a custom set of Japanese Impul Hoshino G5’s in 15×10 -0 offset all round giving it a great overall stance and classic car aesthetic. The car was then capped off with a completely new front steering setup including a quick ratio steering rack, control arms and SLR speed kit which made sure that when this thing hit the turns, it was hitting them hard.

With these improvements made, the car saw a good couple years of drifting on the track. Denis says the car has never missed a beat thanks to the sound reliability of the 1JZ motor and tune which to his knowledge, has been unchanged for the last 6 years! It’s really no surprise that the JZ motors are so commonly used in the drift scene.

The motor is bundled with a Garett 3076R, 6 boost manifold, Sard 880cc injectors, 50mm wastegate and HKS cams to make just over 400hp at 21psi all day, every day. For the transmission, an R154 gearbox with OS Giken clutch and flywheel put power to the rear 2 way Kaaz LSD via a custom 3 inch tail shaft.

After the drifting accolades and battle scars on the car started building up, Denis eventually started to feel a bit bad for the old girl and decided it was time to hang up the boots for the car in terms of drifting duties. Instead he wanted his E30 to be a show car, something that he was able to proudly put on display and allow others to appreciate what he saw in the E30’s as an 18 year old.

Denis enlisted the help of DT Panels in Melbourne to help refresh the car’s tired exterior which resulted in a full respray in BMW E39 Mineral Grey. The genuine Mtech 1 body kit, seamlessly flared guards, front lip and boot spoiler make for a tidy finished product that with the hood closed, hides any trace of the true origins of the car.

With another E30 drift car in the making and a newly acquired S13, Denis hopes to allow this BMW a much needed retirement as a street / show car that’s able to pay homage to a bygone era of performance European cars that with the right mods can still hold their own today.

MODS LIST

– Non vvti 1jz gte
– 6 boost exhaust manifold
– Garrett gtx3076r
– Turbosmart 50mm wastegate
– Custom 3” exhaust with blast pipes
– Koyo radiator with twin thermos
– HKS cams and cam gears
– Custom made intake manifold
– Sard 880cc injectors
– Custom cam covers
– Custom catch can
– PWR intercooler with custom 1 piece piping
– 40L fuel cell
– Holley blue lift pump
– 2.5L surge tank
– Bosch 044 feed pump
– Whole car is done in braided hoses and speedflow fittings

– R154 gearbox
– OS giken triple plate clutch
– Custom made 3” tail shaft
– Kaaz 2 way lsd diff

– Motec m48 pro ecu
– Motec ignition expander
– Motec loom and sensors

– E32 hydraulic booster
– Braided lines
– E30 6 cyl drilled and slotted rotors
– Chasebays hydraulic handbrake
– Custom lines
– Twin caliper rear setup
– Wilwood calipers

– Custom made 15×10 -/+0 Impul Hoshino G5
Always run toyo r1r semi slicks for front but atm it’s on nankang ar1
Rear usually Jinyu

– Custom made metal flares with shaved guards
– Full respray in BMW B39 Mineral Grey
– Genuine mtech 1 full bodykit
– Custom roof spoiler lip
– Custom front splitter lip
– Slightly tinted headlights
– Custom rear tail lights

– Sparco sprint V seats
– Custom suede trimmed dash, centre console, rear seat delete
– Flake red rollcage
– Custom cluster with defi white series gauges
– Nardi steering wheel
– Custom snap-on shifter

– Cusco 10kg front coilovers
– Tein 8kg rx7 coilovers modified to fit e30 and converted to “true” coilover type
– Custom front and rear strut brace
– Custom extended control arms
– SLR “mini kit” and lollipops


DAVID'S WIDEBODY EVO 8 MR // SEPTEMBER FEATURE

DAVID'S WIDEBODY EVO 8 MR
// SEPTEMBER FEATURE

Photos by: Black Market Media | Words by: Ian Lee

Like many in the Japanese car community, David grew up aspiring to own a GTR. Having owned an R34 GTT for quite some time, he had his heart set on an R34 GTR M-Spec in Japan that he’d been hawking for some time. Sadly the car was sold before he was able to put a deposit down and given today’s prices of GTR’s it only makes the story an even more of a bitter pill to swallow.

Heart broken and somewhat searching for a rebound, David started looking into Evo’s. Now I don’t want to say Evo’s are second fiddle to GTR’s but it seems to be a common ownership trajectory in the car community whereby Evo owners sell up and move to GTR’s (not that David fits in this bucket). Maybe it’s seen as the natural progression of AWD turbo performance for owners but let’s not pretend that Evo’s can’t can hold their own, I mean just look at how well they do at Sydney’s WTAC! Outside of circuit racing, Evo’s also have a pretty impressive track record on the drag strip with cars like Powertune’s Snowflake Evo 9 cemented in the Aussie car community as one of the fastest street trimmed cars in the quarter mile at the time. It was a combination of these characteristics, a lot of YouTubing and seeing a few in the flesh that convinced David that the Evo was the right car for him.

When he first got the car, it was a completely bone stock silver 8MR from Japan; a pretty stark contrast to the car you see in the photos today. In retrospect, David said back then ‘I had no intentions of going wide body as I couldn’t justify spending so much money – and here we are”. David’s goal was simple, to make a daily driver that could make his work commutes a bit more interesting. Sounds simple enough right? David’s first mods were your standard bolt ons that included a full exhaust from the dump pipe through to a HKS Hi-Power Silent cat back as well as a rare GruppeM Carbon fibre air box. A set of BC Racing coilovers and bronze Work CR Kai’s completed the look of the car and David was pretty chuffed with what he had assembled. It had the noise, the looks and the daily ability that he wanted from his car, in fact it was perfect for him!

A year on, David found himself wanting some titanium goodness and thought he’d splurge on the coveted Tomei Ti-Extreme that many Evo owners are familiar with. The raspier exhaust note does sound incredible but with a louder note comes some sacrifice in the daily appeal of the car. Adding to his growing collection of mods was another go-to Evo combination of an FP Red turbo and GSC S2 cams. With these plus a few supporting mods like a fuel pump and injectors, David’s car was well on its way to making respectable power for a street car, all that was left was a tune.

For those OG Evo owner’s out there, when it came to tuning your car (especially if you were based in NSW) there was only one guy to go to, Benchmark Solutions. A household name on the EvoOz forums, Benchmark had a great rep and for David it was an easy choice. Not long after linking up with Benny, David was pleased to have a cracking 279kw on 98. The added power put it’s toll on the car however as the stock clutch eventually blew up after a few months. Thankfully with the help of some overnight parts from Japan (courtesy of always resourceful Jesse Streeter) the car was back on the road with a brand new ORC Ogura Twin Plate.

For those who’ve attended a decent Aussie wedding, the chances of some mandatory, marital celebration skids are pretty high. On a sweltering January day, David and his mate with an S14 brought along their Japanese dates for some wedding shenanigans and well, I think we know where this is going. While I think his mate got the sh*ter end of the stick with a blown motor, David ended up walking away from the wedding (literally) with a blown turbo, a fresh set of car problems and plenty of funny stories to tell from the day.

A new locally made GT Pumps 712 turbo was sourced to replace the broken FP Red and Benchmark was again summoned for duties to retune the car on the new setup. What was originally meant to be a touch up tune eventually snowballed (a common theme in David’s history with his Evo) into a two week process to get a flex tune setup which returned 270kw on 98 and 310kw on e85! Some additional supporting mods like a M&W COP kit, Brian Crower cam gears, ARP head studs and Hypertune exhaust manifold also managed to sneak their way into the intermission of David’s ‘touch up tune’ which undoubtedly contributed to the massive power gain.

The car remained relatively untouched for a few years, however like any bad addiction, the itch came back and David felt the desire to modify his car. Given the motor was done to his liking, the next obvious choice for change was the visuals of the car. The Aussie Evo scene has produced some stellar wide body examples in the past (some of which have featured on our website) and it was through seeing Luke Xie’s Midnight Purple Voltex Evo that David had all the convincing he needed to pull the trigger on a similar build himself. Like many other wide body Evo’s of the past, David’s Evo was entrusted to Peter at Bodyform to produce the final product you see today.

Like a true artisan, Pete managed to seamlessly mould APR rear fender and doors into the existing body lines of the car and also ensure enough space for the massive 18×11 SSR wheels that the car would be riding on. Up front, a Voltex inspired front fender was made with a hidden side indicator and vent added too. By far my favourite thing on the car is the assortment of Varis parts including the front bar, side skirts and rear diffuser – a great change from the regular Voltex kits we often see. For paint, David’s first choice of Honda Rootbeer proved to be a bit more difficult to match than expected and instead David was convinced into settling on the Range Rover Ruffina Red colour you see today; a decision he says he was much happier with after seeing the finish product. Some neat enhancements to both the front custom RGB head lights and rear USDM tail lights finish the car off nicely.

Inspired by a Snowflake and snowballing a build himself, the story of David’s Evo has sadly ended. Since writing this article, David has parted ways with his car due to a change in personal circumstances placing him ironically in need of a more daily drivable car. He passes it on with no regrets to what he’s done to his former pride and joy but I think David’s story is a common one in the car scene. It reinforces the joy and addiction we often get when building cars and quite often it’s the journey that makes the ownership more memorable than having the finished product. Wishing David all the best on his quest for a new ‘daily’ but something tells me history may just repeat itself.

MODS LIST

– GT Pumps 712 turbo
– Hypertune HypeX 347SS Exhaust Manifold
– Turbosmart Kompact Plumb back BOV
– GSC Power Division S2 Billet Camshafts
– Supertech Valve Springs
– Supertech Titanium Retainers
– Supertech Valve Stem Seals
– APR Headstuds
– Brian Crower Cam Gears
– M&W Coil on Plug kit
– Walbro 416 Fuel Pump
– Custom made Intercooler piping
– Custom made Mafless Intake pipe
– TurboXS front pipe
– Invidia dump pipe
– Kakimoto Regu 96&R Catback
– GruppeM Carbon fibre duct
– AMS Front mount Intercooler
– 4” K&N intake
– Aftermarket Radiator
– Fullriver HC20 mini battery
– JM Fabrication mini battery tray
– MAFLESS Speed density flex fuel tune by BenchMark Solutions
– ARC engine cover
– Custom ‘midnight purple’ painted rocker cover

– ORC Ogura Twin plate racing clutch
– Lightened flywheel

– Factory ECU

– DBA 4000 rotors
– Ferodo DS2500 pads

– SSR SP1 18×11-0
– Yokohama Advan AD08R 285/30/18

– Professionally resprayed by Sharpline Paints
– Custom widebody done by Peter at Bodyform Motorsports
– Varis rear diffuser
– Varis sideskirts
– Varis front bumper
– USDM Evo Tail lights
– Custom headlights with bluetooth demon eyes and sequential indicators done by That Headlight Guy
– Professionally detailed and ceramic coated by R.H. Detailing

– Steering wheel professionally retrimmed in napa leather & seude by Muse Design
– Evo 9 front leather seats • Retrimmed leather rear seats
– Muse Design armrest cover, hand brake boot and shift boot in suede and red stitching
– HKS Lowered Seat rails
– Tomei Duracon shift kno

– BC Racing BR coilovers
– Cusco front power brace
– Cusco from strut brace

DAVID'S WIDEBODY EVO 8 MR // SEPTEMBER FEATURE

Like many in the Japanese car community, David grew up aspiring to own a GTR. Having owned an R34 GTT for quite some time, he had his heart set on an R34 GTR M-Spec in Japan that he’d been hawking for some time. Sadly the car was sold before he was able to put a deposit down and given the current prices of GTR’s it only makes the story an even more of a bitter pill to swallow.

Heart broken and somewhat searching for a rebound, David started looking into Evo’s. Now I don’t want to say Evo’s are second fiddle to GTR’s but it seems to be a common ownership trajectory in the car community whereby Evo owners sell up and move to GTR’s (not that David fits in this bucket). Maybe it’s seen as the natural progression of AWD turbo performance for owners but let’s not pretend that Evo’s can’t can hold their own, I mean just look at how well they do at Sydney’s WTAC!

Outside of circuit racing, Evo’s also have a pretty impressive track record on the drag strip with cars like Powertune’s Snowflake Evo 9 cemented in the Aussie car community as one of the fastest street trimmed cars in the quarter mile at the time. It was a combination of these characteristics, a lot of YouTubing and seeing a few in the flesh that convinced David that the Evo was the right car.

When he first got the car, it was a completely bone stock silver 8MR from Japan; a pretty stark contrast to the car you see in the photos today. In retrospect, David said back then ‘I had no intentions of going wide body as I couldn’t justify spending so much money – and here we are”. David’s goal was simple, to make a daily driver that could make his work commutes a bit more interesting. Sounds simple enough right? David’s first mods were your standard bolt ons that included a full exhaust from the dump pipe through to a HKS Hi-Power Silent cat back as well as a rare GruppeM Carbon fibre air box.

A set of BC Racing coilovers and bronze Work CR Kai’s completed the look of the car and David was pretty chuffed with what he had assembled. It had the noise, the looks and the daily ability that he wanted from his car, in fact it was perfect for him!

A year on, David found himself wanting some titanium goodness and thought he’d splurge on the coveted Tomei Ti-Extreme that many Evo owners are familiar with. The raspier exhaust does sound incredible but with a louder note comes some sacrifice in the daily appeal of the car.

Adding to his growing collection of mods was another go-to Evo combination of an FP Red turbo and GSC S2 cams. With these plus a few supporting mods like a fuel pump and injectors, David’s car was well on its way to making respectable power for a street car, all that was left was a tune.

For those OG Evo owner’s out there, when it came to tuning your car (especially if you were based in NSW) there was only one guy to go to, Benchmark Solutions. A household name on the EvoOz forums, Benchmark had a great rep and for David it was an easy choice. Not long after linking up with Benny, David was pleased to have a cracking 279kw on 98.

The added power put it’s toll on the car however as the stock clutch eventually blew up after a few months. Thankfully with the help of some overnight parts from Japan (courtesy of always resourceful Jesse Streeter) the car was back on the road with a brand new ORC Ogura Twin Plate.

For those who’ve attended a decent Aussie wedding, the chances of some mandatory, marital celebration skids are pretty high. On a sweltering January day, David and his mate with an S14 brought along their Japanese dates for some wedding shenanigans and well, I think we know where this is going. While I think his mate got the sh*ter end of the stick with a blown motor, David ended up walking away from the wedding (literally) with a blown turbo, a fresh set of car problems and plenty of funny stories to tell from the day.

A new locally made GT Pumps 712 turbo was sourced to replace the broken FP Red and Benchmark was again summoned for duties to retune the car on the new setup. What was originally meant to be a touch up tune eventually snowballed (a common theme in David’s history with his Evo) into a two week process to get a flex tune setup which returned 270kw on 98 and 310kw!

Some additional supporting mods like a M&W COP kit, Brian Crower cam gears, ARP head studs and Hypertune exhaust manifold also managed to sneak their way into the intermission of David’s ‘touch up tune’ which undoubtedly contributed to the massive power gain.

The car remained relatively untouched for a few years, however like any bad addiction, the itch came back and David felt the desire to modify his car. Given the motor was done to his liking, the next obvious choice for change was the visuals of the car.

The Aussie Evo scene has produced some stellar wide body examples in the past (some of which have featured on our website) and it was through seeing Luke Xie’s Midnight Purple Voltex Evo that David had all the convincing he needed to pull the trigger on a similar build himself. Like many other wide body Evo’s of the past, David’s Evo was entrusted to Peter at Bodyform to produce the final product you see today.

Like a true artisan, Pete managed to seamlessly mould APR rear fender and doors into the existing body lines of the car and also ensure enough space for the massive 18×11 SSR wheels that the car would be riding on. Up front, a Voltex inspired front fender was made with a hidden side indicator and vent added too. By far my favourite thing on the car is the assortment of Varis parts including the front bar, side skirts and rear diffuser – a great change from the regular Voltex kits we often see.

For paint, David’s first choice of Honda Rootbeer proved to be a bit more difficult to match than expected and instead David was convinced into settling on the Range Rover Ruffina Red colour you see today; a decision he says he was much happier with after seeing the finish product. Some neat enhancements to both the front custom RGB head lights and rear USDM tail lights finish the car off nicely.

Inspired by a Snowflake and snowballing a build himself, the story of David’s Evo has sadly ended. Since writing this article, David has parted ways with his car due to a change in personal circumstances placing him ironically in need of a more daily drivable car. He passes it on with no regrets to what he’s done to his former pride and joy but I think David’s story is a common one in the car scene.

It reinforces the joy and addiction we often get when building cars and quite often it’s the journey that makes the ownership more memorable than having the finished product. Wishing David all the best on his quest for a new ‘daily’ but something tells me history may just repeat itself.

MODS LIST

– GT Pumps 712 turbo
– Hypertune HypeX 347SS Exhaust Manifold
– Turbosmart Kompact Plumb back BOV
– GSC Power Division S2 Billet Camshafts
– Supertech Valve Springs
– Supertech Titanium Retainers
– Supertech Valve Stem Seals
– APR Headstuds
– Brian Crower Cam Gears
– M&W Coil on Plug kit
– Walbro 416 Fuel Pump
– Custom made Intercooler piping
– Custom made Mafless Intake pipe
– TurboXS front pipe
– Invidia dump pipe
– Kakimoto Regu 96&R Catback
– GruppeM Carbon fibre duct
– AMS Front mount Intercooler
– 4” K&N intake
– Aftermarket Radiator
– Fullriver HC20 mini battery
– JM Fabrication mini battery tray
– MAFLESS Speed density flex fuel tune by BenchMark Solutions
– ARC engine cover
– Custom ‘midnight purple’ painted rocker cover

– ORC Ogura Twin plate racing clutch
– Lightened flywheel

– Factory ECU

– DBA 4000 rotors
– Ferodo DS2500 pads

– SSR SP1 18×11-0
– Yokohama Advan AD08R 285/30/18

– Professionally resprayed by Sharpline Paints
– Custom widebody done by Peter at Bodyform Motorsports
– Varis rear diffuser
– Varis sideskirts
– Varis front bumper
– USDM Evo Tail lights
– Custom headlights with bluetooth demon eyes and sequential indicators done by That Headlight Guy
– Professionally detailed and ceramic coated by R.H. Detailing

– Steering wheel professionally retrimmed in napa leather & seude by Muse Design
– Evo 9 front leather seats • Retrimmed leather rear seats
– Muse Design armrest cover, hand brake boot and shift boot in suede and red stitching
– HKS Lowered Seat rails
– Tomei Duracon shift kno

– BC Racing BR coilovers
– Cusco front power brace
– Cusco from strut brace


AXE’S HLK20B ROCKET BUNNY RX7 // AUGUST FEATURE

AXE’S HLK20B ROCKET BUNNY RX7
// AUGUST FEATURE

Photos by: Black Market Media | Words by: Ian Lee

The FD RX7 is undoubtedly one of the most aesthetically crafted automotive machines to have been produced from Japan. From the swooping body lines to the sleek bonnet, the FD has a timeless shape that even by today’s standards deserves your attention. It’s hard to believe that these cars are almost 30 years old and still turn heads the same way they did when they were released in Japan back in 1992. When released, the FD was an instant hit with the automotive community and journalists flocked to write about it. It was from one of these magazines that Axe Soydas recalls first laying eyes on the car, flicking through the pages for more photos and knowing that he had to own one; it was love at first sight.

The modifying scene for these cars exploded throughout the late 90’s and early 2000’s. Re-Amemiya, Fujita Engineering (Feed), R Magic, Mazdaspeed, TCP Magic and Veilside are just a few of the many companies that erupted into the FD scene, each creating their own unique flagship car sporting some of the most iconic body kits of the 90’s in combination with impressive handling and power mods. By the time Axe was able to buy his first FD in 2003, a number of subsequent Tokyo Auto Salons provided ample inspiration for how he was going to make his own FD into something unique.

After getting an understanding of the ins and outs of the FD, Axe set the goal to create a three rotor, 20B powerhouse. Not an easy feat by any means as we’ll go into detail later, but Axe knew that if he was going down this path, it was going to be done once and done right. So after committing to this vision, He sold his car and went on the hunt for the perfect, unmodified, blank canvas – ‘Granny spec’. In 2014, by some stroke of luck he was able to find a unicorn that hadn’t even had a pod filter or exhaust on it (what kind of sociopath buys a JDM car and resists modifying it?!).

With the canvas obtained, Axe remembers driving it home and immediately stripping the car back to the bone. Out went the interior, motor and most body panels. With the jigsaw pieces all laid out in front of him Axe spent the next 4 years slowly reassembling, replacing, improving and creating the car you see today aka HLK20B.

Let’s start with the obvious and what you are probably most interested in; the motor. For context, the most common Mazda rotary engine is the 13B and comprises of 2 rotors. This is what the RX7’s came factory with. A 20B gets you 3 rotors and for their Le Mans race cars (although some people are crazy enough to put these into street cars), Mazda also made a 26B with 4 rotors. 20B engines while not common to come across are actually factory produced by Mazda and were put into Eunos Cosmos; a pretty forgetful car aside from the power plant.

With the motor in hand, Axe got to work figuring out how to fit it into the car. Despite the large engine bays that the FD’s come with, 20B’s surprisingly don’t fit that easily. The added length of a third rotor coupled with the low, and aggressive bonnet line of an FD means that the motor actually sticks out 15cm which prevents the bonnet from being closed. To address this, Axe had to get a custom sub frame fabricated along with a new steering rack and arms to cater for the larger motor to drop within the engine bay.

While Axe was waiting for the engine mods and other fabrications to be completed, he took this as an opportunity to jazz up the engine bay by shaving and plugging all the unnecessary holes, brackets and mounts. To hide the larger items like the ABS and wiper motor, these were tucked behind the dash to ensure when you looked into the engine bay there was nothing to distract you from admiring the polished 20B. A COMP CT6X Turbo takes full advantage of the extra exhaust gas produced from the 20B with excess boost being passed through a 66mm precision wastegate. Nothing beats the sounds of a rotary on gate, right!

A Carbonetic triple plate clutch and OS Giken 5 speed gear set was sourced and assembled as the transmission of choice for the car. Axe says he opted for the Carbonetic clutch to get a smoother, less aggressive driving experience.

While the car is still on run-in tune, Axe is expecting the car will join the 1000hp club after a full tune can be applied. A Microtech LT16C ECU was selected to manage the operations of the car which as part of the process of installation required Axe to create a bespoke wiring harness to cater for the 20B.

The colour and pumped up Rocket Bunny bodykit make for a pretty strong rationale for the choice of number plates. However Axe’s choice of colour was actually inspired by an earlier toy he owned which was a Kawasaki Ninja ZX10R. These bikes come famously in an eye catching metallic green from factory and it gets just as much kudos being on this FD.

Complementing the primary metallic green on the body, Axe decided to go with an assortment of discrete carbon parts such as the rear diffuser, door handles, ducktail spoiler and pretty much the entire cabin of the car. The carbon fibre bonnet which has been painted except for the vents are also a really nice touch to break up the green on the car. Sitting flush against the widened guards of the car are a set of SSR Professor SP1’s sized at 20×11 in the rears and 20×9.5 in the front. These massive wheels are wrapped in 305 tyres to make sure that there will be plenty of traction to handle the big horsepower that will come. To bring the car to a halt after some cheeky runs in Mexico, are a pretty rare Brembo GT brake kit which was sourced from the UK and includes a pair of massive 6 pot piston brakes and some equally massive rotors up front.

Rounding off the car is the interior which has been designed to both look good and be functional. A sea of carbon fibre and alcantara wrapped dash panels modernise the interior and give it almost a supercar finish. Keeping true to the theme of the car is the subtle green highlights used in the stitching for the Nardi wheel, Bride seats and dashboard. The analogue cluster has been swapped out for a Microtech 7” digital dash which has been moulded seamlessly into the cluster shroud which only further accentuates the fighter jet style cockpit the FD’s already come with.

Unlike other coupes with a closed, separate boot, the FD’s come with a massive rear window and hatch that is publicly on display. Rather than tinting the rear window and leaving the boot factory, Axe made sure that when people looked into the rear of the car, it was just as exquisitely modified as the rest. Inside you’ll find two massive subwoofers that have also been custom moulded in carbon fibre to fit the shape of the boot. The alcantara treatment continues in the boot itself, highlighting the attention to detail on this build.

Axe would like to thank HPRE for their mechanical and electrical work; Kairouz Kustoms for all the body and paint work; AEA Auto Upholstery; Gearbox Masters and Westside Mufflers for their long term support throughout various stages of the build.

The FD RX7 is undoubtedly one of the most aesthetically crafted automotive machines to have been produced from Japan. From the swooping body lines to the sleek bonnet, the FD has a timeless shape that even by today’s standards deserves your attention. It’s hard to believe that these cars are almost 30 years old and still turn heads the same way they did when they were released in Japan back in 1992.

When released, the FD was an instant hit with the automotive community and journalists flocked to write about it. It was from one of these magazines that Axe Soydas recalls first laying eyes on the car, flicking through the pages for more photos and knowing that he had to own one; it was love at first sight.

The modifying scene for these cars exploded throughout the late 90’s and early 2000’s. Re-Amemiya, Fujita Engineering (Feed), R Magic, Mazdaspeed, TCP Magic and Veilside are just a few of the many companies that erupted into the FD scene, each creating their own unique flagship car sporting some of the most iconic body kits of the 90’s in combination with impressive handling and power mods. By the time Axe was able to buy his first FD in 2003, a number of subsequent Tokyo Auto Salons provided ample inspiration for how he was going to make his own FD into something unique.

After getting an understanding of the ins and outs of the FD, Axe set the goal to create a three rotor, 20B powerhouse. Not an easy feat by any means as we’ll go into detail later, but Axe knew that if he was going down this path, it was going to be done once and done right. So after committing to this vision, He sold his car and went on the hunt for the perfect, unmodified, blank canvas – ‘Granny spec’. In 2014, by some stroke of luck he was able to find a unicorn that hadn’t even had a pod filter or exhaust on it (what kind of sociopath buys a JDM car and resists modifying it?!).

With the canvas obtained, Axe remembers driving it home and immediately stripping the car back to the bone. Out went the interior, motor and most body panels. With the jigsaw pieces all laid out in front of him Axe spent the next 4 years slowly reassembling, replacing, improving and creating the car you see today aka HLK20B.

Let’s start with the obvious and what you are probably most interested in; the motor. For context, the most common Mazda rotary engine is the 13B and comprises of 2 rotors. This is what the RX7’s came factory with. A 20B gets you 3 rotors and for their Le Mans race cars (although some people are crazy enough to put these into street cars), Mazda also made a 26B with 4 rotors. 20B engines while not common to come across are actually factory produced by Mazda and were put into Eunos Cosmos; a pretty forgetful car aside from the power plant.

With the motor in hand, Axe got to work figuring out how to fit it into the car. Despite the large engine bays that the FD’s come with, 20B’s surprisingly don’t fit that easily. The added length of a third rotor coupled with the low, and aggressive bonnet line of an FD means that the motor actually sticks out 15cm which prevents the bonnet from being closed. To address this, Axe had to get a custom sub frame fabricated along with a new steering rack and arms to cater for the larger motor to drop within the engine bay.

While Axe was waiting for the engine mods and other fabrications to be completed, he took this as an opportunity to jazz up the engine bay by shaving and plugging all the unnecessary holes, brackets and mounts. To hide the larger items like the ABS and wiper motor, these were tucked behind the dash to ensure when you looked into the engine bay there was nothing to distract you from admiring the polished 20B.

A COMP CT6X Turbo takes full advantage of the extra exhaust gas produced from the 20B with excess boost being passed through a 66mm precision wastegate. Nothing beats the sounds of a rotary on gate, right!

A Carbonetic triple plate clutch and OS Giken 5 speed gear set was sourced and assembled as the transmission of choice for the car. Axe says he opted for the Carbonetic clutch to get a smoother, less aggressive driving experience.

While the car is still on run-in tune, Axe is expecting the car will join the 1000hp club after a full tune can be applied. A Microtech LT16C ECU was selected to manage the operations of the car which as part of the process of installation required Axe to create a bespoke wiring harness to cater for the 20B.

The colour and pumped up Rocket Bunny bodykit make for a pretty strong rationale for the choice of number plates. However Axe’s choice of colour was actually inspired by an earlier toy he owned which was a Kawasaki Ninja ZX10R. These bikes come famously in an eye catching metallic green from factory and it gets just as much kudos being on this FD.

Complementing the primary metallic green on the body, Axe decided to go with an assortment of discrete carbon parts such as the rear diffuser, door handles, ducktail spoiler and pretty much the entire cabin of the car. The carbon fibre bonnet which has been painted except for the vents are also a really nice touch to break up the green on the car. Sitting flush against the widened guards of the car are a set of SSR Professor SP1’s sized at 20×11 in the rears and 20×9.5 in the front.

These massive wheels are wrapped in 305 tyres to make sure that there will be plenty of traction to handle the big horsepower that will come. To bring the car to a halt after some cheeky runs in Mexico, are a pretty rare Brembo GT brake kit which was sourced from the UK and includes a pair of massive 6 pot piston brakes and some equally massive rotors up front.

Rounding off the car is the interior which has been designed to both look good and be functional. A sea of carbon fibre and alcantara wrapped dash panels modernise the interior and give it almost a supercar finish. Keeping true to the theme of the car is the subtle green highlights used in the stitching for the Nardi wheel, Bride seats and dashboard. The analogue cluster has been swapped out for a Microtech 7” digital dash which has been moulded seamlessly into the cluster shroud which only further accentuates the fighter jet style cockpit the FD’s already come with.

Unlike other coupes with a closed, separate boot, the FD’s come with a massive rear window and hatch that is publicly on display. Rather than tinting the rear window and leaving the boot factory, Axe made sure that when people looked into the rear of the car, it was just as exquisitely modified as the rest.

Inside you’ll find two massive subwoofers that have also been custom moulded in carbon fibre to fit the shape of the boot. The alcantara treatment continues in the boot itself, highlighting the attention to detail on this build.

Axe would like to thank HPRE for their mechanical and electrical work; Kairouz Kustoms for all the body and paint work; AEA Auto Upholstery; Gearbox Masters and Westside Mufflers for their long term support throughout various stages of the build.


PECE’S INFAMOUS PANNIC RX3 // JULY FEATURE

PECE’S INFAMOUS PANNIC RX3
// JULY FEATURE

Photos by: Ricky Rigutto | Words by: Ian Lee

With the exception of the last iteration of the “RX” series (what was Mazda thinking with the RX8?), the cars that Mazda produced adorning the RX badge were some of the most iconic cars that came from Japan for over three decades. Like other early 70’s JDM cars, the original R100, RX2 and RX3’s share common styling with American muscle car’s although they didn’t quite share the same v8 rumble (Note we are not opening the can of worms that is LS swapped Mazda debate in this post).

Back when the RX3’s hit the shores of Australia, they were an instant hit with the car community, they had a boxy, muscle car look to it, they sounded awesome and were relatively cheap to buy; in the mid 70’s you could fetch one brand new for under $5,000! RX3’s made their way quickly onto the walls as poster cars for a lot of teens growing up and for Pece, he was lucky enough to have older cousins who owned rotaries. He says he remembers riding to his cousin’s house on his pushbike and always being intrigued by them tinkering with the car and that one day, he had to own one.

Building on from his obsession with rotaries, Pece came to purchase his RX3 around 6 years ago to add to his collection saying that it was always the dream rotary he envisioned to own. Stock examples of RX3’s interestingly are not that easy to come by with the majority of them taking on heavy modifications. For Pece, this wasn’t a problem as he had an end goal to build one up for occasional drag duties and after searching for a while, he picked up his RX3 that you see today.

The heavily modified 13B turbo motor was already producing mid 8 second passes but after many drag runs, the car was in need of some TLC. Pece said that his initial priority was actually to bring it back to street duties with some tidy ups to the engine bay and to the body. As with many well intended ‘tidy-ups’ one thing led to another and he felt that he just wanted to go bare bones and get everything redone.

One quick look from the rear and you instantly know that this thing means business with the rear tyres consuming almost what looks to be half of the width of the entire car. To accommodate for this, some major surgery had to be performed to the rear of the car to cater for the massive 295 rear tyres that wrap around the drag spec Weld Racing wheels. Up front the Rx3 has received the opposite treatment with a pair of front runner’s to help reduce rolling resistance.

To refresh the exterior of the Rx3 Pece knew there was only once place he could take the car to do the job properly, Custom Bodyworks. The vibrant blue of the car is actually a custom colour that was based off an original Mazda factory paint code. What’s pretty neat is to see splashes of the custom blue throughout the car such as the roll cage, seat stitching and various parts of the engine bay like the alternator and throttle body.

Looking into the rear of the cabin, you can see that the tubbing that was done has attempted to be non-intrusive to rear passengers but you can’t help but try to work out how two people would physically fit there without being circus contortionists. Some minor practicality aside, there’s no arguing that the interior work for Pece’s RX3 has been finely put together by Top End Interiors. Small things that add together such as the custom upholstery, colour matched stich lines, rotary seat emblems and seamless roll cage integration provide a well formed cabin.

Finally the dash of the car is one that caught my attention as something that was built purely for the purpose of functionality and nothing else. Instead of retrofitting the original trim by adding an assortment of modern gauges, it has been replaced entirely with a colour matched sheet metal dash that gives almost an industrial factory like finish to the car’s interior.

Completing the interior is the centrepiece gear setup that is responsible for ensuring power is delivered smoothly to the rear massive tyres. Pece opted for a C4 auto transmission that had been custom built for drag duties by Al’s Race Glides which when sitting in the cabin looks more like the thrust lever in a Boeing 747.

The big engulfing rear tyres, latches for a chute and roll cage had my curiosity peaked for what was under the hood although from the cars other mods, I had a fair idea. When I finally got to look at the engine bay of Pece’s car, it was nothing short of what I was expecting – incredible. The perfectly cut hoses and lines that have no slack, the various PAC rotary emblems, rotor oil cap, Cosmo 13B intake manifold, and the turbo that’s bigger than the actual engine itself create a show car spec bay.

The motor itself is a fully rebuilt Pac Performance 13B and before you ask, yes it’s bridgeported. I mean, is it really an RX3 if it isn’t bridgeported? Sucking in more air than a jet engine is the massive Garrett turbo that together with other supporting mods helps the car produce a whopping 760hp at the wheels.

For many who are fortunate enough to own a car they’ve dreamt about as a child, it is truly a surreal experience. Pece says he has to pinch himself every time he steps into his garage just to remind himself of the reality of an RX3 being there for him to drive. While the car was built for the dragstrip, Pece says he’s happy to enjoy the occasional weekend cruise for the time being to remind himself of why as he kid he wanted one so badly.

Pece would like to personally thank all his friends and family for making his childhood dream a reality. He’d also like to give a massive thanks to Pac Performance, Al’s Race Glides, Custom Body Works, Top End Interiors and West Side Mufflers for their various support with the car.

PECE’S INFAMOUS PANNIC RX3 // JULY FEATURE

With the exception of the last iteration of the “RX” series (what was Mazda thinking with the RX8?), the cars that Mazda produced adorning the RX badge were some of the most iconic cars that came from Japan for over three decades. Like other early 70’s JDM cars, the original R100, RX2 and RX3’s share common styling with American muscle car’s although they didn’t quite share the same v8 rumble (Note we are not opening the can of worms that is LS swapped Mazda debate in this post).

Back when the RX3’s hit the shores of Australia, they were an instant hit with the car community, they had a boxy, muscle car look to it, they sounded awesome and were relatively cheap to buy; in the mid 70’s you could fetch one brand new for under $5,000! RX3’s made their way quickly onto the walls as poster cars for a lot of teens growing up and for Pece, he was lucky enough to have older cousins who owned rotaries. He says he remembers riding to his cousin’s house on his pushbike and always being intrigued by them tinkering with the car and that one day, he had to own one.

Building on from his obsession with rotaries, Pece came to purchase his RX3 around 6 years ago to add to his collection saying that it was always the dream rotary he envisioned to own. Stock examples of RX3’s interestingly are not that easy to come by with the majority of them taking on heavy modifications. For Pece, this wasn’t a problem as he had an end goal to build one up for occasional drag duties and after searching for a while, he picked up his RX3 that you see today.

The heavily modified 13B turbo motor was already producing mid 8 second passes but after many drag runs, the car was in need of some TLC. Pece said that his initial priority was actually to bring it back to street duties with some tidy ups to the engine bay and to the body. As with many well intended ‘tidy-ups’ one thing led to another and he felt that he just wanted to go bare bones and get everything redone.

One quick look from the rear and you instantly know that this thing means business with the rear tyres consuming almost what looks to be half of the width of the entire car. To accommodate for this, some major surgery had to be performed to the rear of the car to cater for the massive 295 rear tyres that wrap around the drag spec Weld Racing wheels. Up front the Rx3 has received the opposite treatment with a pair of front runner’s to help reduce rolling resistance.

To refresh the exterior of the Rx3 Pece knew there was only once place he could take the car to do the job properly, Custom Bodyworks. The vibrant blue of the car is actually a custom colour that was based off an original Mazda factory paint code. What’s pretty neat is to see splashes of the custom blue throughout the car such as the roll cage, seat stitching and various parts of the engine bay like the alternator and throttle body.

Looking into the rear of the cabin, you can see that the tubbing that was done has attempted to be non-intrusive to rear passengers but you can’t help but try to work out how two people would physically fit there without being circus contortionists. Some minor practicality aside, there’s no arguing that the interior work for Pece’s RX3 has been finely put together by Top End Interiors. Small things that add together such as the custom upholstery, colour matched stich lines, rotary seat emblems and seamless roll cage integration provide a well formed cabin.

Finally the dash of the car is one that caught my attention as something that was built purely for the purpose of functionality and nothing else. Instead of retrofitting the original trim by adding an assortment of modern gauges, it has been replaced entirely with a colour matched sheet metal dash that gives almost an industrial factory like finish to the car’s interior.

Completing the interior is the centrepiece gear setup that is responsible for ensuring power is delivered smoothly to the rear massive tyres. Pece opted for a C4 auto transmission that had been custom built for drag duties by Al’s Race Glides which when sitting in the cabin looks more like the thrust lever in a Boeing 747.

The big engulfing rear tyres, latches for a chute and roll cage had my curiosity peaked for what was under the hood although from the cars other mods, I had a fair idea. When I finally got to look at the engine bay of Pece’s car, it was nothing short of what I was expecting – incredible. The perfectly cut hoses and lines that have no slack, the various PAC rotary emblems, rotor oil cap, Cosmo 13B intake manifold, and the turbo that’s bigger than the actual engine itself create a show car spec bay.

The motor itself is a fully rebuilt Pac Performance 13B and before you ask, yes it’s bridgeported. I mean, is it really an RX3 if it isn’t bridgeported? Sucking in more air than a jet engine is the massive Garrett turbo that together with other supporting mods helps the car produce a whopping 760hp at the wheels.

For many who are fortunate enough to own a car they’ve dreamt about as a child, it is truly a surreal experience. Pece says he has to pinch himself every time he steps into his garage just to remind himself of the reality of an RX3 being there for him to drive. While the car was built for the dragstrip, Pece says he’s happy to enjoy the occasional weekend cruise for the time being to remind himself of why as he kid he wanted one so badly.

Pece would like to personally thank all his friends and family for making his childhood dream a reality. He’d also like to give a massive thanks to Pac Performance, Al’s Race Glides, Custom Body Works, Top End Interiors and West Side Mufflers for their various support with the car.


PRECISION RACING’S NEW STATE OF THE ART WORKSHOP

PRECISION RACING’S NEW STATE OF THE ART WORKSHOP

When we heard that HOON Tune and Precision Automotive Racing, two heavy hitter Sydney workshops were merging into a powerhouse called “Precision Racing” we knew it was going to be something special. Owners Aaron and Joe have just opened up a new state of the art workshop facility, and will continue to specialise in the Mitsubishi Evo, Ford Falcon, and Nissan R35 GTR, however are now also moving development into the Ford Mustang and Lamborghini Huracan/Audi R8.

We went down to the shop to speak with the guys to find out more about how the shop started and what they have planned. It was also a good opportunity to check out the array of quality customer cars on display!

So Joe, Aaron, how did you guys meet?
Aaron and I met through a friend when I required an urgent dyno hire over the Christmas period one time a few years back. Aaron was good enough to open up late at night for us to get to an event the next day. From then on I was hiring his dyno weekly, and more and more as I was starting to focus on cars full time.

What made you both go into business together?
Over the years we recognised each other’s passion for motorsport and the advancement in technology throughout the street car scene. We were both stretching ourselves thin working all hours of the day and night to get everything done. We were both heading in the same direction in a business sense with each of us wanting to grow and improve on our business’ in order to provide our customers with an even better customer service experience so decided to tackle it together!

Your new shop is state of the art, what can you tell us about it?
Thank you, we are quite proud of it as it’s something we envisioned over the past 2 years, It has turned out exactly how we wanted it to, maybe even better, trying to plan everything is hard but it was all built to make everything more efficient, the benching, cupboards, automated oil reel systems, engine room, fabrication bay, dual dyno room, Ceramic coating and Powder coating bay etc.

What was the goal when you started the business?
To deliver an honest and reliable service that pioneers the trade rather then just being another shop that just sits back and follow trends.

What are the services you offer?
EFi Dyno Tuning, Engine Building, Transmission Building, Mechanical, Auto electrical, fabrication, Powder coating, ceramic coating, CNC Milling services.

What do you specialise in?
The Current Specialties would be Mitsubishi Evo, Ford Falcon, Nissan R35 GTR, and moving development into the Ford Mustang and Lamborghini Huracan/Audi R8.

Do you have any crazy customer stories?
Haha no comment.

What are you currently working on?
Currently the big push is for GTR Festival in August, we have at least 7 big builds happening ranging from 800hp up to about 2200hp, customers who have travelled from VIC, QLD, WA as well as NSW just to have their cars built by us with the aim to be finished and showcased at this event.

What’s your favourite car you have worked on?
I enjoy working with them all, obviously the cars which carry our in house packages are a better experience as everything just works from our many years of R&D.

What are you building for yourself, what do you guys own?
Joe:
Currently going through the different stages of development on my Personal 2018 S550 Mustang GT, and have a 1000hp BF falcon in the shed.

Aaron: Currently planning the Lamborghini Hurrican twin turbo package, RBLOL R35 GTR in the shed 1800hp, and 08SEC Evo 9 in the shed.

Joe, would you ever own an R35? And Aaron, vice versa do you see yourself in a ford?
Joe:
Haha 100% I can appreciate all cars and those things are next level, think supercar abilities for ¼ of the price, and they are getting even more affordable.

Aaron: Shiiiiiit do I have to answer this? To be honest I’m quite impressed with the new 10 speed Mustang, I could see myself owning one, the tricky question is supercharged or Turbo?? Turbos are usually my choice, but I think I’m getting old and a blown mustang might be nice, mainly due to all my other cars having serious turbocharger setups.

What’s your dream car? What are your future plans for the shop?
Joe:
EFI Eleanor Mustang.

Aaron: I think a Twin Turbo Lamborghini Huracan Performance is all the car anyone could ever want.

Is there anything you would have done differently if you could go back?
Maybe an even bigger shop? Haha, no just looking into the future.

PRECISION RACING’S NEW STATE OF THE ART WORKSHOP

When we heard that HOON Tune and Precision Automotive Racing, two heavy hitter Sydney workshops were merging into a powerhouse called “Precision Racing” we knew it was going to be something special. Owners Aaron and Joe have just opened up a new state of the art workshop facility, and will continue to specialise in the Mitsubishi Evo, Ford Falcon, and Nissan R35 GTR, however are now also moving development into the Ford Mustang and Lamborghini Huracan/Audi R8.

We went down to the shop to speak with the guys to find out more about how the shop started and what they have planned. It was also a good opportunity to check out the array of quality customer cars on display!

So Joe, Aaron, how did you guys meet?
Aaron and I met through a friend when I required an urgent dyno hire over the Christmas period one time a few years back. Aaron was good enough to open up late at night for us to get to an event the next day. From then on I was hiring his dyno weekly, and more and more as I was starting to focus on cars full time.

What made you both go into business together?
Over the years we recognised each other’s passion for motorsport and the advancement in technology throughout the street car scene. We were both stretching ourselves thin working all hours of the day and night to get everything done. We were both heading in the same direction in a business sense with each of us wanting to grow and improve on our business’ in order to provide our customers with an even better customer service experience so decided to tackle it together!

Your new shop is state of the art, what can you tell us about it?
Thank you, we are quite proud of it as it’s something we envisioned over the past 2 years, It has turned out exactly how we wanted it to, maybe even better, trying to plan everything is hard but it was all built to make everything more efficient, the benching, cupboards, automated oil reel systems, engine room, fabrication bay, dual dyno room, Ceramic coating and Powder coating bay etc.

What was the goal when you started the business?
To deliver an honest and reliable service that pioneers the trade rather then just being another shop that just sits back and follow trends.

What are the services you offer?
EFi Dyno Tuning, Engine Building, Transmission Building, Mechanical, Auto electrical, fabrication, Powder coating, ceramic coating, CNC Milling services.

What do you specialise in?
The Current Specialties would be Mitsubishi Evo, Ford Falcon, Nissan R35 GTR, and moving development into the Ford Mustang and Lamborghini Huracan/Audi R8.

Do you have any crazy customer stories?
Haha no comment.

What are you currently working on?
Currently the big push is for GTR Festival in August, we have at least 7 big builds happening ranging from 800hp up to about 2200hp, customers who have travelled from VIC, QLD, WA as well as NSW just to have their cars built by us with the aim to be finished and showcased at this event.

What’s your favourite car you have worked on?
I enjoy working with them all, obviously the cars which carry our in house packages are a better experience as everything just works from our many years of R&D.

What are you building for yourself, what do you guys own?
Joe:
Currently going through the different stages of development on my Personal 2018 S550 Mustang GT, and have a 1000hp BF falcon in the shed.

Aaron: Currently planning the Lamborghini Hurrican twin turbo package, RBLOL R35 GTR in the shed 1800hp, and 08SEC Evo 9 in the shed.

Joe, would you ever own an R35? And Aaron, vice versa do you see yourself in a ford?
Joe:
Haha 100% I can appreciate all cars and those things are next level, think supercar abilities for ¼ of the price, and they are getting even more affordable.

Aaron: Shiiiiiit do I have to answer this? To be honest I’m quite impressed with the new 10 speed Mustang, I could see myself owning one, the tricky question is supercharged or Turbo?? Turbos are usually my choice, but I think I’m getting old and a blown mustang might be nice, mainly due to all my other cars having serious turbocharger setups.

What’s your dream car? What are your future plans for the shop?
Joe:
EFI Eleanor Mustang.

Aaron: I think a Twin Turbo Lamborghini Huracan Performance is all the car anyone could ever want.

Is there anything you would have done differently if you could go back?
Maybe an even bigger shop? Haha, no just looking into the future.


KEENAN’S 59OON TURBO EG CIVIC // JUNE FEATURE

KEENAN’S TURBO EG CIVIC
// JUNE FEATURE

Photos by: Michael Carroll | Words by: Ian Lee

The Honda scene has had a welcome resurgence in the past few years. Clean, tastefully modified and heavily invested Civics, S2000’s and Integra’s are becoming more mainstream alternatives to the tried and tested Evo’s and Silvia’s you see rolling around. However, that hasn’t always been the case. True enthusiasts would argue they’ve stood by the brand before it was “cool” which I don’t refute at all but for a long time, the majority of Honda’s were simply the first car for most p-platers and none more so than the trusty Honda Civic. They were the hand me down that your family owned longer than your pet dog, or were your elderly neighbour’s car they’d owned and had decided to move on to a shiny new 2019 Honda Jazz.

How could your parents fault these as first cars for young p-platers? Cheap, quiet and about as fast as a rock rolling down a mildly steep hill. All characteristics you’d sadly be mistaken for attributing to Keenan’s Spoon inspired, flame throwing
Honda EG Civic.

Keenan’s Civic doesn’t hide that it’s not normal. But it wasn’t always like this. The Honda life for Keenan started much like our story above. Keenan recalls it was in high school of 2012 that he decided to get his first Civic. His other couple of mates at the time were also picking these cars up and Keenan though, why not.

While the big plans of a turbo build were not even conceived in his mind at that point, Keenan says that his preliminary goal when getting the car was to just tidy it up within reason and cost. As Keenan started stripping the car of the previous owner’s tacky modifications he started to explore the Honda modding scene. After trawling through modding catalogues and browsing the web, Keenan found one brand that he wanted to align to for his build; Spoon.

It always pleases my own OCD when I see a car that possesses uniform aftermarket parts and looking at Keenan’s EG, you can really see he’s pulled out all stops to get the car representing the brand. Beyond looking awesome, Keenan’s addiction to Spoon parts has also yielded some other pretty interesting perks and stories. Thanks largely to Gaijin Garage, Keenan has been able to form a relatively close relationship with Tatsuru Ichishima – the founder of Spoon. In addition to getting the standard catalogue items you see on his car today, Keenan also managed to get a hand signed valve cover from Tatsuru and also a Spoon certified plate number; both of which are not easy to come by.

So as the boxes upon boxes of Spoon parts arrived at his door, Keenan in the background spent time preparing the chassis for the build. Keenan started with the paint that was in serious need of redoing. While the car came as an acceptable Milano Red from the showroom floor, the previous owner had taken it to the booth for a custom Gold. While this was great for maximum bass and Autosalon shows, it wasn’t really the colour Keenan was after for his Spoon inspired street build. Keenan settled on Honda’s OEM Captiva blue for his car saying it was his favourite all time colour for the EG’s. It’s always refreshing to see a car restored in period correct colours. It just looks right. Along with a new paint job, Keenan also took up the gruelling task of shaving and tucking the engine bay to provide a cleaner view of the madness that was yet to be put into the car.

During the paint job, Keenan also decided to run wider quarter panels which perhaps was foreshadowing the need for wider rubber up front to keep traction. With finally assembly of the painted shell coming to an end, Keenan was then able to start dressing the car up with all the Spoon goodies that he’d been hoarding in his room. A carbon Spoon lip, duckbill, side mirrors, window banner and subtle decals were all added to complete the package. And if you were still unsure what parts the car was running, the Spoon big brake kit sitting pretty behind the bronze CE28’s should let you know that the car wasn’t modded for dress ups.

While it would’ve been awesome to see the car running with the iconic, 13k rpm bat out of hell crate motor that Spoon builds, I think you’ll agree that Keenan has made up for it with the package he eventually settled on. The motor is still period correct in that it’s a B16 but that’s pretty much it. With Keenan opting to go down the turbo route, the whole motor had to be reworked to cater for the additional power that the Precision 5452 turbo was going to be dumping to the front wheels. An array of upgrades to the manifold, radiator, cooling system, fuel system and drive train all orchestrated by a Hondata S300 has given Keenan 300WHP to play with.

Where’s the fun in turboing a Civic if you’re not even going to let people know about it? Sure you can go with the sleeper approach but you’ve already angered a mob of Honda purists by turboing it so why not wear it proud. Influenced by both watching American Honda Civic drag videos and also a few too many beers with a fabricator mate, Keenan says that was all it took to convince himself that a bonnet screamer had to be done. A bonnet screamer does come with a cost though.

Keenan says he’s constantly worried driving the car around in public and while never pulled up on it by cops and luckily being waved through RBT’s a few times, Keenan seldom takes the beast out of its cage. As far as future plans go, Keenan says he’s got an upgraded head with GSC cams and a Supertech valve train that will be paired with a new e85 tune to finish off the car. However thereafter is still undecided. Personally, I’d love to see this thing go around the track!

MODS LIST

– 300whp

– B16a
– Eagle rods
– JE pistons (9:1 comp)
– ACL Race Bearings
– ARP main studs
– ARP conrod studs
– ARP head studs
– Rywire tucked harness,
– B16a Hasport engine mounts
– Full Race T3 ProStreet exhaust manifold
– Precision 5452 turbo
– Till MVr 44mm external wastegate with screamer pipe
– 3” Full Race dump pipe
– Custom made 3” exhaust (fabulous fabrications)
– High flow cat and resonator
– Magnaflow muffler
– Skunk2 Pro Series intake manifold
– Skunk2 70mm racing throttle body
– RC Racing 750cc injectors
– AEM fuel rail
– AEM fuel reg
– Walbro 400 LPH fuel pump
– Racer Engineering fuel filter
– Tial-Q BOV
– 600hp Garrett intercooler
– Password JDM pod filter
– Custom intercooler (fabulous fabrications)
– Peterson oil catch can
– Aeroflot fittings
– PWR oil cooler
– Racecar Engineering oil sandwich plate x2
– Relocated battery to boot
– Mishimoto alloy radiator
– Mishimoto coolant hoses
– Top Gum leads
– Integra Type R strut bar
– Resprayed engine bay to suit wheels

– B16B EK9 gearbox
– OEM 1.5 LSD
– Spoon shift linkage
– Exedy clutch

– Hondata s300 tuned by Definition Motorsports

– Spoon sports callipers
– Goodridge braided break lines

– Ce28n

– Captiva blue paint
– Spoon lip
– Spoon mirrors
– Spoon duck bill
– JDM bronze glass
– Spoon decals

– Spoon ti gear knob
– Spoon steering shell
– Recaro pole positions

– Zeal coil overs w/ swift springs
– Hard race camber arms and bushes all round

KEENAN’S 59OON TURBO EG CIVIC // JUNE FEATURE

Photos by: Michael Carroll | Words by: Ian

The Honda scene has had a welcome resurgence in the past few years. Clean, tastefully modified and heavily invested Civics, S2000’s and Integra’s are becoming more mainstream alternatives to the tried and tested Evo’s and Silvia’s you see rolling around. However, that hasn’t always been the case.

True enthusiasts would argue they’ve stood by the brand before it was “cool” which I don’t refute at all but for a long time, the majority of Honda’s were simply the first car for most p-platers and none more so than the trusty Honda Civic. They were the hand me down that your family owned longer than your pet dog, or were your elderly neighbour’s car they’d owned and had decided to move on to a shiny new 2019 Honda Jazz.

How could your parents fault these as first cars for young p-platers? Cheap, quiet and about as fast as a rock rolling down a mildly steep hill. All characteristics you’d sadly be mistaken for attributing to Keenan’s Spoon inspired, flame throwing Honda EG Civic.

Keenan’s Civic doesn’t hide that it’s not normal. But it wasn’t always like this. The Honda life for Keenan started much like our story above. Keenan recalls it was in high school of 2012 that he decided to get his first Civic. His other couple of mates at the time were also picking these cars up and Keenan though, why not.

While the big plans of a turbo build were not even conceived in his mind at that point, Keenan says that his preliminary goal when getting the car was to just tidy it up within reason and cost. As Keenan started stripping the car of the previous owner’s tacky modifications he started to explore the Honda modding scene. After trawling through modding catalogues and browsing the web, Keenan found one brand that he wanted to align to for his build; Spoon.

It always pleases my own OCD when I see a car that possesses uniform aftermarket parts and looking at Keenan’s EG, you can really see he’s pulled out all stops to get the car representing the brand. Beyond looking awesome, Keenan’s addiction to Spoon parts has also yielded some other pretty interesting perks and stories. Thanks largely to Gaijin Garage, Keenan has been able to form a relatively close relationship with Tatsuru Ichishima – the founder of Spoon. In addition to getting the standard catalogue items you see on his car today, Keenan also managed to get a hand signed valve cover from Tatsuru and also a Spoon certified plate number; both of which are not easy to come by.

So as the boxes upon boxes of Spoon parts arrived at his door, Keenan in the background spent time preparing the chassis for the build. Keenan started with the paint that was in serious need of redoing. While the car came as an acceptable Milano Red from the showroom floor, the previous owner had taken it to the booth for a custom Gold. While this was great for maximum bass and Autosalon shows, it wasn’t really the colour Keenan was after for his Spoon inspired street build. Keenan settled on Honda’s OEM Captiva blue for his car saying it was his favourite all time colour for the EG’s. It’s always refreshing to see a car restored in period correct colours. It just looks right. Along with a new paint job, Keenan also took up the gruelling task of shaving and tucking the engine bay to provide a cleaner view of the madness that was yet to be put into the car.

During the paint job, Keenan also decided to run wider quarter panels which perhaps was foreshadowing the need for wider rubber up front to keep traction. With finally assembly of the painted shell coming to an end, Keenan was then able to start dressing the car up with all the Spoon goodies that he’d been hoarding in his room. A carbon Spoon lip, duckbill, side mirrors, window banner and subtle decals were all added to complete the package. And if you were still unsure what parts the car was running, the Spoon big brake kit sitting pretty behind the bronze CE28’s should let you know that the car wasn’t modded for dress ups.

While it would’ve been awesome to see the car running with the iconic, 13k rpm bat out of hell crate motor that Spoon builds, I think you’ll agree that Keenan has made up for it with the package he eventually settled on. The motor is still period correct in that it’s a B16 but that’s pretty much it. With Keenan opting to go down the turbo route, the whole motor had to be reworked to cater for the additional power that the Precision 5452 turbo was going to be dumping to the front wheels. An array of upgrades to the manifold, radiator, cooling system, fuel system and drive train all orchestrated by a Hondata S300 has given Keenan 300WHP to play with.

Where’s the fun in turboing a Civic if you’re not even going to let people know about it? Sure you can go with the sleeper approach but you’ve already angered a mob of Honda purists by turboing it so why not wear it proud. Influenced by both watching American Honda Civic drag videos and also a few too many beers with a fabricator mate, Keenan says that was all it took to convince himself that a bonnet screamer had to be done. A bonnet screamer does come with a cost though.

Keenan says he’s constantly worried driving the car around in public and while never pulled up on it by cops and luckily being waved through RBT’s a few times, Keenan seldom takes the beast out of its cage. As far as future plans go, Keenan says he’s got an upgraded head with GSC cams and a Supertech valve train that will be paired with a new e85 tune to finish off the car. However thereafter is still undecided. Personally, I’d love to see this thing go around the track!

MODS LIST

– 300whp

– B16a
– Eagle rods
– JE pistons (9:1 comp)
– ACL Race Bearings
– ARP main studs
– ARP conrod studs
– ARP head studs
– Rywire tucked harness,
– B16a Hasport engine mounts
– Full Race T3 ProStreet exhaust manifold
– Precision 5452 turbo
– Till MVr 44mm external wastegate with screamer pipe
– 3” Full Race dump pipe
– Custom made 3” exhaust (fabulous fabrications)
– High flow cat and resonator
– Magnaflow muffler
– Skunk2 Pro Series intake manifold
– Skunk2 70mm racing throttle body
– RC Racing 750cc injectors
– AEM fuel rail
– AEM fuel reg
– Walbro 400 LPH fuel pump
– Racer Engineering fuel filter
– Tial-Q BOV
– 600hp Garrett intercooler
– Password JDM pod filter
– Custom intercooler (fabulous fabrications)
– Peterson oil catch can
– Aeroflot fittings
– PWR oil cooler
– Racecar Engineering oil sandwich plate x2
– Relocated battery to boot
– Mishimoto alloy radiator
– Mishimoto coolant hoses
– Top Gum leads
– Integra Type R strut bar
– Resprayed engine bay to suit wheels

– B16B EK9 gearbox
– OEM 1.5 LSD
– Spoon shift linkage
– Exedy clutch

– Hondata s300 tuned by Definition Motorsports

– Spoon sports callipers
– Goodridge braided break lines

– Ce28n

– Captiva blue paint
– Spoon lip
– Spoon mirrors
– Spoon duck bill
– JDM bronze glass
– Spoon decals

– Spoon ti gear knob
– Spoon steering shell
– Recaro pole positions

– Zeal coil overs w/ swift springs
– Hard race camber arms and bushes all round


TUNED UNITED FESTIVAL 2019 COVERAGE

Since finishing the build on our Rocket Bunny Boss V2 S14, we haven’t really had the time to take it out to any meets/shows. So when Tuned International’s 2019 United Festival came up on the calendar, we thought why not head down.

We got there nice and early on a crispy Autumn morning and watched all of the cars roll in and set up for the show and shine. It was a great day with a big turn out of quality cars on display. Our RB8055 S14 even scored two trophies, “Best 90’s” and “Best of Show”. Until next time!

Seeing a Hakosuka in real life was something else. This example on Te37V’s was perfection.

RB8055 made lots of friends on the day, and even scored some trophies!
Thanks for the love.

The J & J Motorsport Supra looks like it eats children. Seriously though this
track ready weapon was very impressive.

Bayside Blue is such an OG colour for the R34 GTR.

The BUZKLA Rx7 was recently finished and unveiled on the day. It certainly gets your attention with the bright blue paint and red centred BBS wheels.

Loving the fitment of the AC Schnitzer wheels on this BMW E36.

The number plates say it all, this S14 was seriously neat!

Something different from the majority of OEM+ style VW Golf’s getting around.

Rarely do you see JDM cars built to this level! Nothing has been left untouched, from the bright green Rocket Bunny exterior, crazy 20B engine package and full reupholstered interior. full feature article on HLK20B coming soon.

Our November 2018 Feature car looking fresher than ever.

Dahtone Racing knows how to GTR. Absolute weapons!

There was a great mixture of JDM/Euro cars on display.

There was no shortage of GTR’s at the event, not that we’re complaining!

Not all hero’s wear capes! This Pulsar was seriously wild!


BRANDON’S MNP II R34 GTR // MAY FEATURE

Growing up playing the Gran Turismo series of video games, Brandon Milevski always selected the R34 GT-R as his ultimate battle weapon. “It was always the yellow one too, I don’t know why, but it was my favourite back then. I never touched the midnight purple version as I thought they were the ugliest,” laughed Brandon. Oh, how times have changed.

After owning a mildly modified R33, a then 19-year old Brandon went on the lookout for a new machine – the fabled R34 GT-R. In his eyes, it was the epitome of the Nissan range. “Originally I was looking to purchase a silver, R34 V-Spec from Melbourne, but then my uncle came across this GT-R advertised locally in Perth on good old Gumtree. The advert was lacking a heap of information, apart from the basic heading – “R34 Skyline”. It was worth a look at least I thought.”

After making contact with the owner, Brandon received the bad news that the car was already sold. “I was devastated but continued the search, until we came across the same advert a fortnight later. The original purchaser couldn’t get the finance on the car. I was blown away when we arrived, as it was the midnight purple colour. I hadn’t really considered it until then. All of a sudden it appealed to me. My uncle looked at me with a smile, and I just knew I had to buy it – you don’t come across a rare colour like this every day. It was a no brainer.” The deal was knocked on the head on Christmas Eve, back in 2013.

The car had a few bolt-ons here and there but, ultimately it was a fresh canvas for Brandon to manipulate to his taste. “The car maintained the factory body kit, so I decided to add some more flavour with a Z-tune front bumper and front fender combo, with the matching carbon fibre, vented-bonnet. I think it toughens up the car a whole heap more.”

The rear of the car is treated to a genuine V-Spec diffuser with extended Nismo ‘Track Ready’ style fins. The Quest Japan LED tail lights glow bright, bright red at night for an ominous look for those left behind on the freeways of Perth city.

Wheeling the car was a tough choice, but wisely, Brandon kept it clean and simple – Nismo LMGT4 18×9.5 +12 wheels got the nod, and are shod with 285/35/18 rubber. Slamming the car closer to terra firma is a Nismo S tune suspension set up. Hidden behind the blacked out rims, are T3 DBA slotted discs with race pads.

Inside the ride, not much has changed since the car left Japan, albeit for an extensive audio system (hidden in factory outlets) and a Blitz EBC. In the future, race seats may find their way in there.

Being more focused on street duties, Brandon has opted to keep the engine mods to a practical level, but the car the still pumps out a respectable 648rwhp @ 24psi on E85. He can thank the team at C-Red for that result. Internally, the RB26 has copped Eagle H-beam rods with CP 86.5mm forged slugs and King race series bearings. Under the candy apple red rocker cover, is a Tomei metal head gasket, ARP head studs and a pair of HKS 272 cams 8.7 lift drop in step 1 cams with HKS adjustable cam gears.

Replacing the standard twin turbos is a single, Garret T04Z with a .84 rear/v band and a custom T51 front housing from OCD works. I just had to have that iconic T51 spool sound,” laughed Brandon. The new snail is fitted to a 6boost high-mount manifold with a Tial 44mm ‘gate regulating business. A full 3.5-inch exhaust is complimented with a Tomei titanium muffler.

2200cc Bosch injectors are matched to a black Raceworks alloy fuel rail, with a Turbosmart fuel pressure regulator controlling the twin Walbro 460 L/h in-tank fuel pumps. A Haltech Platinum Pro plug-in ECU makes the car sing a sweet tune.

With several years of cruising already under his belt, future plans for the car are minimal. “Reaching 800hp with a larger turbo is quite achievable and is something I would like to explore. Selling the car is something I would never really consider, these types of cars will continue to become more and more desirable and it really is my dream ride.

The attention the car gets is phenomenal; you can’t go somewhere without people wanting to take photos or talk about the car. The most discussed topic is the paint colour of course. I wish I could go back and tell my younger self, just how wrong I was about midnight purple.”


DAHTONE RACING’S R32 GTR // APRIL FEATURE

GTR. Three letters that represent a machine that nearly every car enthusiast is familiar with, appreciates the meaning of, and would love to have sitting in their garage. The King of Japanese performance cars as Anthony puts it and who could possibly disagree, especially when you look at his meticulously crafted R32 GTR.

With GTR’s becoming a rare and expensive commodity in the car market, it’s not uncommon to see the same street builds and setups on these cars. Big single turbo, Tomei exhaust, LMGT’s, Bride Lowmax’s; the standard. But it’s safe and it works. On a car increasing in price, most owners do often opt for the more community accepted confines of modifying, however Anthony had a different goal in mind. A build that was half a decade in making, Anthony’s transformation of his GTR is one of careful planning, fastidious assembly and sticking to a clear vision no matter the setbacks. His vision? Create a GTR that was one off, unique and yet seemed as OEM as possible. The twist? Do this while running one of Sydney’s top GTR workshops and looking after a family at the same time.

Rewind 7 years and you may have seen Anthony’s white R32 GTR on the road sitting on BBS LM’s as opposed to his current Meister setup. You’d have to be quick in sighting the car though as it wasn’t long after the initial purchase that Anthony decided to retire it as a daily driver and undergo initial cosmetic improvements. This included N1 body parts like skirts, a front bar, rear pods and boot lip. Some additional carbon goodies including custom side skirt extensions, Abflug front diffuser and Rocket Dancer spoiler extension finished iteration one in terms of the look of the car. Honestly speaking, not much changed visually from then until now, but I think for those who know the car, it’s what’s under the hood that really grabs your attention.

With the car now a weekender, Anthony turned his attention to the engine bay. What started initially as a paint refresh quickly spiralled out of control and laid the foundations for the clinically assembled engine bay you see today. As an experienced advocate and mechanic for the twin cam RB26, Anthony said it was only natural that his car was destined to have a monster of an engine setup. With the bay being sprayed, work began on building his dream motor with the ambition of putting it in not long after the car had come back from the painters. That was the plan anyway. You may recall earlier in the write up that Anthony is actually workshop owner by profession and that means customers come first. An urgent need from a customer saw the motor he built for himself being sold and Anthony was put promptly back to square one.

In between balancing the daily workload of running his shop, the limited time he had to build his own car gave Anthony the luxury (and curse) of having time to think about exactly what he wanted to do with it. What eventually kick started the build was his desire to create a one of a kind exhaust manifold and after months of tinkering and mock ups, his idea came to life. With his unique manifold locked down, the rest of the jigsaw pieces fell into place and like clockwork, Anthony selected and assembled the necessary supporting engine components he was all too familiar with.

Moving to the inlet side of the motor, Anthony wanted to eliminate the rats nest of vacuum and water lines Nissan kindly left to GTR owners of the future. In order to eliminate this while also keeping the ITB’s, a custom drive by wire and Plazmaman plenum was crafted to solve the problem.

In keeping with the ‘one off’ design principle that Anthony had for the car, every pipe and line you could bend, every reservoir that could be filled was customised and hand fabricated to Anthony’s spec. Even the number plate bracket wasn’t spared from the fabrication table! The result is clear though, through a complete overhaul of the engine bay, an unparalleled degree of consistency was able to be formed and every part in the bay looks as though it was put there straight out of the factory.

To send power to the wheels, a rebuilt R34 GTR Getrag 6 speed was optioned instead of a dog box with Anthony citing he wanted to maintain the OEM driving experience of the car but still have confidence that the box was able to handle big power. A billet NPC clutch finished the transmission setup.

It’s almost impossible to talk about early 90’s Nissan interiors without mentioning the infamous dash cracks and/or bubbles that torment Skyline and Silvia owners alike. Unfortunately, Anthony’s GTR was no exception and so the dash was the first interior item to get changed for the better. For seats, Bride Cuga’s were selected for comfort and uniqueness compared to some of Bride range. However, this wasn’t unique enough for Anthony and so both front and rear seats underwent a custom upholstery job that featured leather trimming and Bride fabric centres. Finally, a Cusco 5 point half cage in white was installed to add protection and rigidity to the cabin, break up the black interior and quite frankly, just look awesome inside the car.

But how about the engine you’re probably thinking. For the time being, the exact specs are under wraps until the car has undergone the full tune but rest assured, Anthony has high hopes and confidence for the potential power using the combination of internals he’s selected himself. For reference, the run in tune saw the car make 650hp on just 20psi.. with wheel spin issues on the dyno. Needless to say, stay tuned for the full hub dyno run at 40psi.

On the surface and perhaps to the untrained eye, Anthony’s GTR may look like so many others. In a modifying age where sexspec is dead and OEM+ is king, appreciation comes more in the creating the fine balance of unique and subtle modification while maintaining the timeless looks of these iconic 90’s Japanese performance cars. Striking this balance is not an easy one however Anthony’s car stands true to this ethos and has really produced an incredible modern take on an R32 GTR.

Anthony would like to put out a special thanks to all his friends, family and automotive suppliers, partners and mates including Mick’s Motorsports, Auto Elements, Just Upholstery, and Fabtech Global.

MODS LIST

– 650hp @ 20psi

– RB26/30 (test engine)
– Platinum Racing Products engine brace, R35 coil kit, trigger kit, alternator bracket, A/C relocation kit
– CWC LS1 alternator conversion
– Custom thick wall stainless exhaust manifold
– Garrett GTX4294 turbo
– Custom intercooler
– Custom Plazmaman intake manifold to suit 6 throttle drive by wire system
– Dahtone Racing 6 throttle drive by wire system
– 1650cc Bosch Motorsports injectors
– Dahtone Racing billet fuel rail
– Custom intercooler pipes with Dahtone Racing/HDI clamps
– Custom cross flow radiator
– Custom radiator hard pipes with HDI clamps
– Real Carbon fibre moulded cam cover set
– Stainless 4” exhaust system
– Frenchy’s Performance Garage twin Walbro 460 in-tank fuel pump kit
– Turbosmart 60mm wastegate and FPR2000 fuel pressure regulator
– Garage Defend carbon fibre cooling panel
– All Braided hoses and AN fittings for everything (vacuum, boost, coolant, fuel, engine oil, power steering)

– NPC billet twin plate clutch
– Custom concentric slave cylinder/pull to push converter
– R34 GTR 6 speed Getrag gearbox

– Haltech Elite 2500
– Haltech Wb1 single channel wideband kit
– Flex sensor
– 3 x Bosch pressure and temperature combo sensors (oil, coolant and fuel
– Custom hidden loom with motorsport bulk head connector

– R34 GTR Brembos with custom “J slotted” rotors
– Braided lines
– Modified brake booster (helps the booster work better with big cams and low vacuum)

– Work Meisters
– 19 x 11
– 285/30/19 Toyo T1R

– N1 front bumper
– N1 side skirts
– N1 rear pods
– N1 boot lip
– OEM rear wing
– Carbon Fibre Fujimura Auto Rocker Dancer aero flap
– ADM rear number plate garnish
– Shaved rear bumper
– Carbon fibre Ab Flug front splitter
– Custom carbon fibre side skirt extensions
– Carbon fibre Varis vented bonnet
– Ganador aero mirrors
– FEED Afflux carbon mirror caps
– D-Speed clear corner indicators
– R35 GTR boot badge
– R34 GTR front guard badges
– Custom aluminium front number plate bracket

– Custom leather trimmed carbon fibre backed Bride Cuga seats
– OEM rear seat re-trimmed to match front seats
– Cusco 5 point roll cage
– Carbon fibre scuff plates
– Nismo carbon fibre rear view mirror cover
– Tomei instrument cluster
– Superior Auto Carbon Fibre stereo surround
– Nardi 330mm Deep corn steering wheel
– Custom reconditioned OEM 6 speed gear knob

– BC BR coilovers
– HICAS elimination kit


JAKE’S WIDEBODY EVO IX // MARCH FEATURE

The word ‘evolution,’ in the scientific world, looks at the theory of how living things change over time, and how they have come to be the way they are. But, in the car tuner world, the word ‘evolution,’ is linked to one of the most iconic cars to ever come out of the Japanese Domestic Market scene… The Mitsubishi Evolution. Through Mitsubishi’s run of Evolutions some have become more iconic than others, but it’s fair to say the penultimate Evolution, the Evo IX, has cemented itself as one of the most appealing and tuner friendly model’s out of the lot.